Filtering by Category: Graciela Iturbide

Graciela Iturbide's Mexico

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON 
465 Huntington Avenue
January 19 - May 12

featured00_1064x.jpg

In these times, when walls literally and symbolically epitomize a perverse, exclusionary outlook on the foreign, the work of Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide strikes with the relentless perspective of an insider. Frustrating the clichés of folklore and the picturesque, Iturbide’s sumptuous black-and-white images reach for the untold stories and overlooked narratives of her home country—its intricate religious and indigenous cultures, conflicting histories, and ever-transitional present. Covering five decades, her first major exhibition on the East Coast unites more than 125 photographs, primarily drawn from Iturbide’s own collection, and features thirty-seven new acquisitions, including pieces from “Juchitán,” 1979–88, a series on Mexico’s Zapotec women; six bewitching images of birds; and documentation of Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul. Accompanied by a beautifully illustrated catalogue, this timely tribute to one of Mexico’s greatest living artists reveals that the other is always us.

Curated by Kristen Gresh

Sabrina Mandanici

continue reading at artforum.com

The Sunlit Studio a Son Built for His Photographer-Mother

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

By Luisita Lopez Torregrosa | New York Times Style Magazine

18tmag-itu-slide-FJQ8-superJumbo.jpg

ON A COLONIAL back street in historic Coyoacán, in central Mexico City, a three-story brick tower rises above the low-roofed adobe homes in a labyrinthine neighborhood. The fall afternoon’s fading light tinges the building’s facade — walls of porous bricks laid at right angles to let in air and light while shielding the interior from view — a burnt sienna. This is Studio Iturbide, the latest project by the Mexico City-based firm Taller / Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo, who built it for Rocha’s mother, the photographer Graciela Iturbide, whose portraiture, most famously of weathered women in Oaxacan villages, is in the permanent collections of the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Brooklyn Museum.

The 75-year-old Iturbide is waiting at the doorway, diminutive, her black hair short and wavy, her complexion milky. “Mauricio will be here soon,” she says, as we enter her monolithic workspace, which is constructed of little more than red brick and wood-framed panes of glass. The architects created a hundred models before agreeing on the current design: three nine-foot-high, 300-square-foot rooms stacked atop one another, along with two interior bricked-in patios on the first floor furnished with clay pots of cacti and other regional plants, which offer the only visual disruption of the house’s earthen hues and exacting lines. Inside, the brick walls are adorned with little but the shadows of the day’s moving light.

Taking the broad wooden stairs, which are joined by invisible steel supports and appear suspended in midair, Iturbide walks us from the formal first-floor living room, with its Isamu Noguchi paper lantern and low, modernist sofa, past the casual second-floor family room and up to the top floor of the building. “This is my studio, where I work,” she says, her arms outstretched to take in the airy 16-by-19-foot space, lit by the sun coming in through two wall-size windows. Here, on a nine-foot-long oak table, Iturbide edits her photographs. Forty years of archives are stored in dozens of flat, black boxes on custom hardwood bookshelves that rise from either side of the table. “The interior space is very important for me and my work,” she says. “I need to be alone often.”

This is not the first time Iturbide’s son has made her a building: Across the street is her main house, a cream-colored adobe structure that Rocha built in 1991, when he was 25 and had just finished architecture school. In 2014, seeking more space (and freedom from her belongings), Iturbide purchased an empty lot and asked him to build on it. Her only condition was that it be made of brick: “What I wanted was to be tranquil in my studio,” she says. “I gave him total freedom.” The result, which took two years to complete, combines four kinds of brick — handmade in different dimensions in Puebla, a city known for its ceramics — with tzalam, a heavily grained hardwood brought from Mexico’s tropical south. Iturbide calls the building her “small factory of bricks.”

Continue reading at nytimes.com

Spotlight Series: Zeke Peña

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

“Graciela's work grabs you, it pulls you in. So when I was working with her images I tried not to change them much, because I don't think they need anything. I was simply was trying to translate and place them in a graphic narrative.” -Zeke Peña

About fourteen years ago while traveling on a road trip through Northern Mexico, Zeke Peña brought only one book with him: a small, pocket-sized book of photographs by Graciela Iturbide. A few years ago, the works of Graciela Iturbide entered his life again when he was presented with the opportunity to illustrate Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide, published by Getty Publications. It was not until he was preparing the proposal for the book that he made the connection between the subject of his most recent project and the photographs that accompanied him throughout the landscape of Northern Mexico. 

Zeke Peña, Juchitán, 2017

Zeke Peña, Juchitán, 2017

In the pages of Photographic, Peña recreated Iturbide’s subjects in a graphic form, allowing the reader to understand the narrative around Iturbide’s images. In one of Peña’s drawings, two women from Juchitán walk across the composition with their skirts flowing behind them as they move forward. The two walking women originate from a photograph in Iturbide’s series from Juchitán, a body of work that greatly resonates with Peña both because of the indigenous community’s resistance to western colonial, patriarchal influence and the subjects’ proximity to his own cultural and racial identity. Through the research that Isabel Quintero — the author of Photographic and Peña’s collaborator —  conducted, Peña learned in great detail about the lives and history of the women in Juchitán. Within a community where women owned property and had enormous agency relative to in western culture, the women in Juchitán moved with both power and a joyful sense of ease, which is felt strongly in Iturbide’s photographs. 

In Zeke’s drawing of the two women from Juchitán, they move across an empty space where the viewer can imagine their surroundings, but in the actual context of the photograph the words La Libertad are sprayed above them. Within their environment, everyday life moves alongside the political undertones of their existence. Libertad from the pressures of an imposing colonial culture that denounces their cultural practices and the agency of women in their community. Libertad from the invisibility of their lives and stories, for in Peña’s words: “For indigenous people, story is everything.”

Graciela Iturbide,  Untitled , from her series Juchitán, c. 1986


Graciela Iturbide, Untitled, from her series Juchitán, c. 1986

As a storyteller himself whose work is rooted in the oral histories of people of the border region, Peña felt the impact of Iturbide’s subjects and the mastered methodology with which she approached and photographed them, continuing to pass oral histories through a photographic form. Through the respect that Iturbide gave her subjects and stories, she spotlights the indigenous cultures she photographed in intimate and true detail. In Peña’s work from Photographic, he derives the subjects from Iturbide’s photographs while bringing his own discoveries and connections to the page, highlighting the intimate narratives that play through the works of Graciela Iturbide with his own pen. 

ROSEGALLERY presents PhotoGRAPHIC: The Life of Graciela Iturbide

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

ROSEGALLERY presents PhotoGRAPHIC, an exhibition of the upcoming graphic novelPhotoGRAPHIC: The Life of Graciela Iturbide, published by the J. Paul GettyAccompanying works by the legendary photographer, ROSEGALLERY will present the novel in its entirety, with original drawings by Zeke Peña and prose by Isabel Quintero. Photographs, illustrations and prose come together to illuminate the artistic power of Iturbide’s life and work.

Presenting the multifaceted manifestations of her story, the exhibition will run from 8 September 2017 until 21 October 2017, with a public opening on the 8th of September. 

Just as in the graphic novel about her life, Graciela Iturbide’s work exists at the intersection of captivating imagery and poetic language. Born in Mexico in 1942, Iturbide studied photography under the Mexican icon Manuel Álvarez Bravo, a contemporary of Tina Modotti, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. With the uniqueness of her own eye, Iturbide captured her surroundings in intimate and empowering expressions. Often highly metaphorical, Iturbide’s photographs visually and poetically connect her own surroundings with a deeper understanding of the world. 

Told through text, illustrations and Iturbide’s photographs, Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbidedelves into Iturbide’s history and photographic works with the guiding vision of the artist herself. From the Sonora Desert to Juchitán, India and the American South, the graphic novel tells of Iturbide’s explorations throughout the world, all caught through the lens of her camera. In the beginning pages of the graphic novel, it states, “Graciela Iturbide is a photographer. She is an icon. Orgullo mexicano. Maestra.” With her masterfully crafted photographs, Iturbide proves each title true. Iturbide’s exploration of often overlooked and eclectic subjects brings a range of perspectives to her work and her own story. Each image transcends the border between reality and myth. Birds come to her through many of her dreams and often reappear in flight in her photographs, tracing a line through her imagination and her world in the poetic language of their collective motion. Following the trail of birds on the walls of PhotoGRAPHIC, one may glimpse into the rhythm of Iturbide’s vision as her story unfolds.


image credit: Pages from Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide © 2018 J. Paul Getty Trust, www.getty.edu/publications . Text © Isabel Quintero, illustrations © Zeke Pefia, photographs © Graciela Iturbide.

PHOTOGRAPHIC: The Life of Graciela Iturbide

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

ROSEGALLERY
Friday, 8 September, on view until 21 October, 2017

ROSEGALLERY presents Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide, the forthcoming graphic novel about Graciela Iturbide, published by The Getty Publications in Fall of 2017. Pages from the graphic novel will be exhibited as a narrative along the gallery walls, interlaced with pages from the graphic novel, photographic prints by Graciela Iturbide and original illustrations by Zeke Peña.
The exhibition will be open to the public during our normal business hours of 10 am to 6 pm on Friday, 8 September.

Pages from Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide © 2018 J. Paul Getty Trust,  www.getty.edu/publications . Text © Isabel Quintero, illustrations © Zeke Pefia, photographs © Graciela Iturbide.


Pages from Photographic: The Life of Graciela Iturbide © 2018 J. Paul Getty Trust, www.getty.edu/publications. Text © Isabel Quintero, illustrations © Zeke Pefia, photographs © Graciela Iturbide.

Graciela Iturbide at The Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Graciela Iturbide will be on view at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery from August 26th, 2017 until January 7th, 2018 as part of the exhibition Revolution and Ritual: The Photographs of Sara Castrejón, Graciela Iturbide and Tatiana Parcero, in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. 

War, indigenous cultures and inner transformation ferment in Revolution and Ritual: The Photographs of Sara Castrejón, Graciela Iturbide and Tatiana Parcero. In this exhibition, the Williamson focuses on the works of three Mexican women photographers who explore and transform notions of Mexican identity in images that range from the documentary to the poetic.

Garciela Iturbide,  Untitled (Bull Walking through Birds) , Jaipur, India

Garciela Iturbide, Untitled (Bull Walking through Birds), Jaipur, India

For more information, please visit ArtFixDaily 

Fundación MAPFRE, home of the largest collection of Graciela Iturbide works

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Launched nine years ago, Fundación MAPFRE’s photography collection is still in its early days. The remarkable series of photographs by Graciela Iturbide, however, not only constitutes one of the main features of this collection, it also aptly illustrates its ambition: to strive to fully represent artists included in the collection in order to get to know and understand their work as fully as possible.

"Famous for her vision of indigenous Mexican cultures, which marked her entrance into the world of photography, Graciela Iturbide considers her work as an ongoing process of vital exploration, since photographing is above all a pretext for expanding knowledge. Her journeys are an integral part of her research on identity; however, the power of her images does not depend on the exoticism of her world travel, but rather emanates from her exceptional ability to foreground aspects often absent from photographic representation, and which she manages to capture through a simple working method: by integrating into, and cohabiting with, the people she photographs."

Read the full write-up on loeildelaphotographie.com
For more images by Graciela Iturbide, visit her ARTIST PAGE.

This Upcoming Exhibition Highlights the Work of 116 Radical Latina & Latin American Artists

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.
Graciela Itrubide,  Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas ,  Juchitán, Mexico,  1979

Graciela Itrubide, Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico, 1979

“Because the system’s so biased and so restrictive, so much wonderful art has [gone] completely unnoticed.” With these words, Cecilia Fajardo-Hill succinctly described the impetus for an upcoming exhibition – Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985 – at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. The last few decades has seen progress for female artists, but the art world hasn’t reached parity, with men still basking in the limelight far more often than women.

As LA Weekly notes, the Guggenheim dedicated 86 percent of solo shows to men in 2014. And between 2007 to 2014, the Tate Modern in London only featured female artists’ works in solo exhibitions a quarter of the time. Radical Women – which Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta curated together – exclusively focuses on Latinas and Latin American women who US museums don’t typically feature. “The reason for this is not a question of talent, but of a patriarchal matrix placed on the history of Latin American and Latina art,” Fajardo-Hill tells LA Weekly. “In other words, the system was even more biased than we knew it to be.”

In 2010, When they began looking into this topic, the curators found themselves having to defend the need for an exhibit that closely looks at Latin American and Latina art. Detractors told them that only a select number of women were worth highlight. But they refused to buy into this misguided notion, finding instead, that these women’s stories are necessary to tell.

“We are looking at a lot of women that have been completely overlooked,” Fajardo-Hill told the Los Angeles Times. “These are women that have shaped how we understand contemporary art today, how we use our bodies, how we can think about our bodies at a conceptual level.”

For complete details, please visit, remezcla.