Filtering by Category: Lise Sarfati

Alicia Eler reviews HE/SHE/THEY for Aperture

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Alicia Eler writes, "Spanning over eighty years of photographs, an exhibition explores the gender non-conforming potential of the word 'they.'

Yasumasa Morimura, Jane Fonda 5 (Barbarella), 1995  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

Lise Sarfati, Malaïka #7, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

The singular gender-neutral pronoun “they” was named word of the year in 2016. Judging from the social and historical depth of photography and archival imagery in the exhibition He/She/They, currently on view at ROSEGALLERY, which includes work by more than fifteen artists, it’s crazy to think that it took this long to get American culture at large to recognize life outside the gender binary. Ranging from the early 1930s to the present, the works exhibit a wide array of bodies, locations, gazes, and socioeconomic perspectives, and consider the intersectional influence of race and class on notions of gender.

Since this exhibition is presented in Los Angeles, Lise Sarfati’s Malaïka #7, Corner 7th Street and Spring from the series On Hollywood (2010), is appropriately local and captures a woman trying to make it in the entertainment industry. In this startling photograph, a young woman appears forlorn, perhaps returning from an audition, unsure of what to do next. The actress’s face, and the low-angle perspective, is reminiscent of Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Still #21 (1978), in which a young woman, who could be any (white) woman, looks intently beyond the frame, with an imposing block of skyscrapers forming the background. Marrying visual art and Hollywood icons, her dress and hairstyle reference Marilyn Monroe and the “dumb blonde” archetype.

Graciela Iturbide, Carnaval, Tlaxcala, Mexico, 1974  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

...Other works in the show focus less on the performance of gender, and more on people who defy normative gender distinctions. Nineteenth-century photographs depict Native American “two-spirit” individuals—those who participate in gender roles not assigned to their sex—but the accompanying text explains that intersex, androgynous, and gender non-conforming people could be held in high regard outside of Eurocentric, heteronormative cultures. In photographs by Mexican artist Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, who identified as Muxe (Zapotec for homosexual and “genderqueer”), poses for the camera wearing a dress and sombrero, a traditionally male accessory.

He/She/They leans heavily on the visual language of portraiture, which might suggest a desire for authenticity in documentation, in contrast to much of the dynamic content found online, where self-expression by social media sensations, celebrities, and everyday people appears to be constantly evolving. The photographs in this show offer a fixed moment in time, declarative and definitive, but also remain open to the many shades of identity, the gender non-conforming potential of the word “they.”

Alicia Eler is a journalist based in Los Angeles. A contributor to New York Magazine, The Guardian,VICE, LA Weekly, Hyperallergic, Art21, and Artforum, she is currently working on her first book,The Selfie Generation (Skyhorse).

He/She/They is on view at ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica, through November 12, 2016."

Read the full review on aperture.org/blog!

Lise Sarfati Exhibition OH MAN Curated by Francesco Zanot at the Italian Center of Photography

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

ROSEGALLERY artist Lise Sarfati has a solo exhibition curated by Francesco Zanot at the Italian Center of Photography in Tornino, Italy.  The exhibition of Sarfati's work made in Downtown Los Angeles will be on display from 27 January to 13 March 2016.

Lise Sarfati,  Oh Man , 2012 © Lise Sarfati

Lise Sarfati, Oh Man, 2012 © Lise Sarfati

"Main subject of the work are some men in the urban context. Do not perform any action relevant. In most cases they walk. Or they are caught in a moment of pause in the middle of a shift. Nevertheless their presence is evident. Energy charge. Powerful. Wherever they are in the rectangle of the image, they are of central importance. In a sort of update of the humanist tradition, Lise Sarfati eliminates any indication of his fictional narrative tension and heroic, leaving the field open to the pure appearance in the space of a number of individuals."

OH MAN - Photographs by Lise Sarfati
Italian Center of Photography
27 January to 13 March 2016

Visit camera.to for details.

For more on Lise Sarfati visit her ARTIST PAGE.

PASSING THROUGH on exhibit

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Featuring works by twenty artists from our gallery roster, Passing Through pays homage to the transience of all things and the power of the photographer to immortalize experience with the click of the camera shutter. The exhibition celebrates the essential magic of the medium, which allows us to give pause in a world of rushing and inescapable impermanence.  Together, the disparate photographs and imagery of Passing Through form a journey with its own unique pace, one that mirrors the ebbs and flows of life’s seasons from the youthful rush of possibility through the expectations and trials of middle age and beyond. It is a trip by car across the American landscape, a bicycle excursion through the city, a waltz across a romantically lit room, the shifting sky-scape with ever-changing clouds, an unexpected and devastating automobile crash. The physical world traversed and inhabited by the artists in the exhibition echoes the topography of our internal worlds in that both are subject to the great equalizer of time over which we can never exert power.  To hold onto what invariably slips past, and give undeniable presence to a subject even as it begins to fade, is the photographer’s attempt to counter the fundamental dissolution of existence, out of which the most profound beauty, loss and aspirations materialize.

passingthrough