Filtering by Tag: John Chiara

John Chiara Honored by his Alma Mater CCA

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

For Bay Area native John Chiara (MFA 2004), who is preparing to create a series of photographs in and of New York, swapping the Bay Area for the Big Apple presents a few challenges.

The issue is not at all about tackling New York's art scene; having had 2013 shows at Pier 24 Photography and the de Young in San Francisco, as well as at galleries in Los Angeles, Atlanta, and Zurich, it's clear that he is already coming into focus for an increasing audience worldwide.

Take a virtual walk-through of the Pier 24 show with Chiara’s work »

Rather, New York will be a challenge in terms of the subject matter it offers up, given that until now Northern California has been such a looming presence in Chiara's work. The Bay Area infuses the photography of this San Francisco-born artist like the terroir of a vintage bottle of Saint-Emilion.

Working throughout the Bay Area, Chiara takes large photographs -- as big as 50 by 80 inches, to be specific -- using a massive, custom, hand-built camera that he transports on its own trailer.

Once he's selected a location, he situates and then physically enters the camera, placing positive color photographic paper on its back wall, then using his hands to burn and dodge the image by manipulating the light coming in the lens.

The paper is then developed by spinning the drum, which agitates chemicals over the photographic paper. The process often leaves irregularities on the picture, and each picture is necessarily one of a kind, since the process involves neither film nor negatives.

Given the painstaking, manual method, progress is steady and measured. Currently, he is having another camera built in preparation for his project in New York.

Watch a KQED Spark video feature on Chiara’s process »

John Chiara, “21st at Kansas,” 2004 50 x 63 in. Unique photograph on Cibachrome paper

Finding His Artist’s -- and Teacher’s -- Voice

After graduating from the University of Utah in 1995 with a BFA in photography, Chiara found it a challenge to support his artwork financially. He had a succession of jobs, from graphic design to substitute teaching (K-12), running a screenprinting business, and web development for real estate firms.

"When I graduated," he says, "there were two jobs I swore I'd never do: work in a Joe Schmo photography lab and teach high school." Not only has he served his time in a photo lab ("a real sweatshop," he laughs), but also he now teaches part-time at Jewish Community High School of the Bay in the Western Addition neighborhood of San Francisco.

“I love that school," he says. "It's one of the best places in the city. I teach photography and sculpture. There are seven or eight kids in each class, so I feel I can really have an effect."

Chiara credits his teaching skills to his mentors at CCA: Larry Sultan, Richard Misrach, and Susan Ciriclio.

"Susan gave me really practical advice: how to format a professional teaching résumé, how to develop a teaching philosophy. She also championed programs in which grads could co-teach, which hugely improved my ability to support myself."

Ciriclio played a part in Chiara's education even before he got to CCA. "I started applying in 1995, although I wasn't accepted until 2002," he recalls. "And even before I ever arrived, Susan was helping me. We talked about my process, about Cibachrome printing and drum processing. She gave me the technical information I needed to grow as a photographer."

Advice from Larry Sultan

Nearly a decade out from his MFA, as he starts to see wider success with his photography, Chiara continues to draw on advice he was given at CCA.

"This year I sold some work. It's the first time I've hired people. It's the first time I've made some money. And I remembered something Larry Sultan told me: 'When you make money from your art, invest right back into it.' So when I heard that the manufacturers of Ilfochrome paper were discontinuing it, I bought what I hope is a lifetime supply, plus a freezer to store the paper at minus-20 degrees. I'm definitely committed to working this way."

Sultan also played a critical role in Chiara's evolution as an artist. In 2003, his photography featured jagged elements on the surface of the paper. "There was a lot of psychological disruption to the image. I felt it was meaningful to the state I was in. It was a difficult time for me -- I was dealing with a lot of stuff, working too hard running my business.

"Larry recognized the sense of controlled chaos in my work, and told me the control had gone too far. My hands were in it too much. So I started to find elements in the landscape that would disrupt the field of view. I became more of a photographer.

"Larry Sultan was the most articulate, intuitive professor. Almost shamanistic, at times. He had hyper-intuition; he'd be looking at your work and get totally under the surface of it, and then articulate his reactions so clearly."

Bay Area Roots

Chiara was born in San Francisco and grew up in the hills near Concord and Walnut Creek. As a youth, he found himself drawn to early photographers of Northern California such as Carleton Watkins, who used an oversize camera and huge glass-plate negatives.

Chiara's work combines much of that sensibility with an appreciation for the imperfections of the medium: hazy light, uneven exposures.

This past year, Chiara's geographical focus opened up. Over six months he made a series of trips to Southern California, commissioned by Rose Shoshana of Rose Gallery in Santa Monica, and subsequently showed them at her gallery. "L.A. is fascinating," says Chiara. "And for my work, it wasn’t a stretch at all."

He has also spent time recently in a different kind of art hotspot: Clarksdale, Mississippi. "That idea came from Rose Shoshana too. I really trust her, and she told me, 'I think your work would really sparkle there.' She set the whole thing up. It was kind of magical. And incredibly hot! It's so different because it's flat farmland. And it's all green. Everything's green."

Upcoming Solo Show

Wherever he sets his lens, from Contra Costa County to Clarksdale, from the East Bay to the East Coast, John Chiara continues to develop. You can see his work here in San Francisco in his upcoming March 2014 solo show at Haines Gallery.

Please click here to be directed to the CCA website.

John Chiara to show at Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

THE ROAD

Before us - in between a concrete present, an illusory point.

The mythic anonymity.

The potential of discovery - getting lost - again. The autonomy of choice. The bravado of choosing. The regret of lost possibility. The Road - nexus of free will and fate, Ruled by instincts, logic, unpredictable contingencies.

Brandon Andrews

Kate Bonner

Matthew Carter

John Chiara

Chris Engman

Hamish Fulton

Nicolas Grenier

James Hyde

Masood Kamandy

Molly Larkey

Cristóbal Lehyt

Lily Stockman

Britton Tolliver

Jonathan VanDyke

Aaron Wrinkle

____

THE ROAD explores one of the most complex of human conditions -

the autonomy of choice; the principle of selection that all choices

come at the exclusion of others. In varying symbolic permutations,

it wonders through a range of conceptual, stylistic and philosophical

propositions, engaging notions of free will and fate,

irony and sincerity, myth and truth, action and indecision,

along with a dose of irrationality and, perhaps, regret.

The Road is the journey of unending choices,

marked equally by achievement, approval and success, as it is

by assumption, misunderstanding and failed attempts.

___

JULY 13 - AUGUST 17, 2013

ARTISTS RECEPTION:

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 6 - 9 PM

Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

2685 S LA CIENEGA BLVD

MOPA: John Chiara

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Seeing the Light

03.19.2013, Chantel Paul

When it comes to curating exhibitions, one of my favorite experiences is working with contemporary photographers. It allows for the interaction I would never be able to have with the masters who have paved the way, like Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Harry Callahan and Ruth Bernard. Towards the end of last year, I had the pleasure of meeting some wonderful photographers for MOPA’s upcoming fall exhibition Staking Claim: A California Invitational. One of these photographers has just opened an exhibitoin of new work  atRose Gallery in Santa Monica. His name is John Chiara and as a contemporary photographer, he’s using one of the oldest forms of equipment to make his incredibly dreamy and powerful images, the camera obscura. And not just any camera obscura, but one large enough for him to crawl inside, cut a piece of paper off a roll, and tape it to the back wall for exposure! Don’t believe me? Watch this video from 2006 to see for yourselves how he does it. Photographs like this don’t come easy. It’s taken Chiara years to perfect his craft and the work has paid off. His work is one more reason to mark to your calendars for the opening of Staking Claim: A California Invitational on October 12th here at MOPA. Until then…enjoy!

Text and image courtesy of the Museum of Photographic Arts

Lenscratch: John Chiara

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

John Chiara is opening an exhibition, John Chiara: Los Angeles, at the well regarded Rose Gallery in Los Angeles from March 23rd through May 11, 2013 featuring unique Ilfochrome prints. A San Francisco-based artist, John pushes the boundaries of the photographic medium through his choice of process and the mastery of its possibilities. His  giant cameras, which he designed and built himself, are transported to locations on a flatbed trailer to produce one-of-a-kind large-scale prints.

The design of the cameras, which is much like daguerreotype box cameras, allows the artist to simultaneously shoot and perform his darkroom work while images are recorded directly onto oversized photosensitive paper (not film). This process, which John first discovered as a student in 1999, invites anomalies in his final prints and adds to the mystery and lyricism of his photographs.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO

John received a B.F.A. in photography from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and an M.F.A. in photography from the California College of the arts in 2004.  In 2011 the Pilara Foundation commissioned the artist’s Bridge Project for their permanent collection and it was included in the exhibition “HERE” at Pier 24 Photography.  He has been included in group and solo exhibitions nationally and abroad.
John's latest series of photographs is focused entirely on the city of Los Angeles.  Though L.A. is one of the most photographed cities on the globe  - a city built on image -  and John’s depictions of it are unexpected.  His Los Angeles is neither idyllic nor sprawling urban hell.  It is not a "city of glamour nor the spectacle of exploitation that it is often deemed to be".  His interest lies with the psychological underpinnings of the city’s development and the subtle ways these are revealed in the shifting landscape.
All Images courtesy, the artist, Thomas Von Lintel Gallery, New York and ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica

Text courtesy of Lenscratch.

Platform Photo: John Chiara at ROSEGALLERY

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

john chiara: los angeles at the rose gallery

(c) John Chiara – Image Courtesy of the artist, Von Lintel Gallery, New York, and ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica.

ROSEGALLERY presents the international debut of John Chiara: Los Angeles.

San Francisco-based artist John Chiara pushes the boundaries of the photographic medium through his choice of process and the mastery of its possibilities.  His approach is distinguished by its incredible physicality and recalls the early days of the medium when artists dealt with heavy, awkward equipment and endured long exposure and development times.  Chiara’s giant cameras, which he designed and built himself, are transported to locations on a flatbed trailer to produce one-of-a-kind large-scale prints.  The design of the cameras, which is much like daguerreotype box cameras, allows the artist to simultaneously shoot and perform his darkroom work while images are recorded directly onto oversized photosensitive paper (not film).   This process, which Chiara first discovered as a student in 1999, invites anomalies in his final prints and adds to the mystery and lyricism of his pictures.

Until recently the artist has worked almost exclusively in the Bay Area.  This Spring ROSEGALLERY is pleased to present for the first time, Chiara’s latest series of photographs, focused entirely on the city of Los Angeles.  Though L.A. is a one of the most habitually photographed cities on the globe  - a city built on image –  Chiara’s depictions of it defy precedent and expectation.  His Los Angeles is neither idyllic rural Eden nor sprawling urban hell.  It is not the mythic city of glamour nor the spectacle of exploitation that it is often deemed to be.  Instead, Chiara has honed in on delicate transformations in the environment, both natural and man-made. His interest lies with the psychological underpinnings of the city’s development and the subtle ways these are revealed in the shifting landscape.  His Los Angeles images are powerfully direct: a desert fan palm growing implausibly through fortified concrete; the reflection of power lines in the blazing sun; a hillside exploding with scorched earth; the shimmering façade of the Department of Water and Power.  But the subversive and idiosyncratic nature of Chiara’s uncommon technique makes for images that transcend conventional depictions of place and transforms familiar landscapes into hypnotic visual passages through the ordinary world.

John Chiara earned a B.F.A. in photography from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and an M.F.A. in photography from the California College of the arts in 2004.  In 2011 the Pilara Foundation commissioned the artist’s Bridge Projectfor their permanent collection and it was included in the exhibition “HERE” at Pier 24 Photography.  He has been included in group and solo exhibitions nationally and abroad.  This will be the artist’s first solo show at ROSEGALLERY.

Venue: Rose Gallery, 2525 Michigan Ave G5, Santa Monica

Open: 23th March – 11th May, 2013.

Text courtesy of Platform Photo.

Artdaily: John Chiara at ROSEGALLERY

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

John Chiara debuts unique Ilfochrome prints at ROSEGALLERY

John Chiara, Agua Dulce at Route 14. Image courtesy, the artist, Thomas Von Lintel Gallery, New York and ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica.

SANTA MONICA, CA.- ROSEGALLERY announces the international debut of John Chiara: Los Angeles. Unique Ilfochrome prints are on view from 23 March through 11 May, 2013. San Francisco-based artist John Chiara pushes the boundaries of the photographic medium through his choice of process and the mastery of its possibilities. His approach is distinguished by its incredible physicality and recalls the early days of the medium when artists dealt with heavy, awkward equipment and endured long exposure and development times. Chiara’s giant cameras, which he designed and built himself, are transported to locations on a flatbed trailer to produce one-of-a-kind large-scale prints. The design of the cameras, which is much like daguerreotype box cameras, allows the artist to simultaneously shoot and perform his darkroom work while images are recorded directly onto oversized photosensitive paper (not film). This process, which Chiara first discovered as a student in 1999, invites anomalies in his final prints and adds to the mystery and lyricism of his pictures. Until recently the artist has worked almost exclusively in the Bay Area. This Spring ROSEGALLERY presents for the first time, Chiara’s latest series of photographs, focused entirely on the city of Los Angeles. Though L.A. is one of the most habitually photographed cities on the globe - a city built on image - Chiara’s depictions of it defy precedent and expectation. His Los Angeles is neither idyllic rural Eden nor sprawling urban hell. It is not the mythic city of glamour nor the spectacle of exploitation that it is often deemed to be. Instead, Chiara has honed in on delicate transformations in the environment, both natural and man-made. His interest lies with the psychological underpinnings of the city’s development and the subtle ways these are revealed in the shifting landscape. His Los Angeles images are powerfully direct: a desert fan palm growing implausibly through fortified concrete; the reflection of power lines in the blazing sun; a hillside exploding with scorched earth; the shimmering façade of the Department of Water and Power. But the subversive and idiosyncratic nature of Chiara’s uncommon technique makes for images that transcend conventional depictions of place and transforms familiar landscapes into hypnotic visual passages through the ordinary world. John Chiara earned a B.F.A. in photography from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and an M.F.A. in photography from the California College of the arts in 2004. In 2011 the Pilara Foundation commissioned the artist’s Bridge Project for their permanent collection and it was included in the exhibition “HERE” at Pier 24 Photography. He has been included in group and solo exhibitions nationally and abroad. This will be the artist’s first solo show at ROSEGALLERY.

Text courtesy of Artdaily.org

de Young: Crown Point Press at 50

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.
John Chiara
24th at Carolina (center), 2006
Photogravure printed in color on gampi paper chine collé
Image size: 23 1/2 x 19 1/4
Paper size: 32 1/2 x 27 1/2
Edition size: 15
Publisher: Crown Point Press
Printer: Dena Schuckit

Crown Point Press at 50

October 20, 2012 - February 17, 2013

Crown Point Press at 50 marks the press’s 50th anniversary and features prints by 15 internationally renowned artists made at the press over the course of five decades. Some, such as Robert Bechtle and Wayne Thiebaud, have returned to the press throughout their careers; others, including Darren Almond, Chris Ofili, and Kiki Smith, are more recent additions to the roster. All share an enthusiasm for expanding their artistic practice by making prints.

When Kathan Brown established Crown Point Press in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1962, she expressed a commitment to etching that was remarkable for the time. Most workshop-based print publishing ventures in the 1960s  focused on lithography and screenprinting. Brown offered an alternative and welcomed artists who were new to intaglio, giving them an opportunity to explore an alternative printmaking possibility that was ideally suited to contemporary expression.

Witnessing the evolution of artistic movements such as Minimalism, Conceptualism, and Neo-figuration over the last 50 years, the press has applied a constant level of innovation to etching while working with visiting artists, regardless of style, to realize complex ideas. From the late 1960s, Brown and her staff of printers have developed ways in which photo projects could be realized, first as photoetchings, and then, beginning in the 1990s, in the revival of photogravure, a printing process that has been around for as long as photography itself. This process, along with that of color aquatint—which has become a trademark of the press—permits artists to swathe their compositions in printed tonal fields, merging ink and paper.

Text courtesy of the de Young

John Chiara: The Richmond Arts Center

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

John Chiara, Echo Lake at Meyers Grade (Far Left), 50'' x 78'', Dye Destruction Process, Unique Photograph, 2010

South Gallery, In Conversation: June Schwarcz and John Chiara presents a landscape of inscrutable sculpture and metallic photography, full of mystery and alchemical beauty. Curated by Muriel Maffre, this unique pairing of two artists who transform their material with such mastery leaves us wondering what genre of art it is: Sculpture? Photography? Painting? Yes. June Schwarcz' non-utilitarian vessels seem to be ceramic, but are actually painted metal — inexplicably weighty and yet ethereally weightless. John Chiara uses a camera obscura to produce his epic photography, developing his simple landscape images on large sheets of thin metal that he then frames to hang on the wall. The effect of the conversation between the two artists is revolutionary in its elegance and mysteriously simple beauty.

The Richmond Arts Center

John Chiara - Photographic Process

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xYWehyfFcM

Aug 4, 2009

This well done documentary covers John Chiara's photographic process and work flow. It is well worth the seven minutes. Chiara shoots with a ultra-large format camera cityscapes by building his own equipment and processes. His intensely analog techniques capture something unique. He lives in San Francisco, California.