Filtering by Tag: Rinko Kawauchi

Spring 2013 Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program Lecture: Rinko Kawauchi

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steinmetz Rinko Kawauchi Untitled, from the series of Ametsuchi 2012

Lecture by Rinko Kawauchi Tuesday, September 24, 2013 / 7PM Timken Lecture Hall, California College of the Arts 1111 Eighth Street San Francisco, CA 94107

Pier 24 Photography is pleased to announce the Spring 2013 Larry Sultan Visiting Artist Program in collaboration with California College of the Arts and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Free and open to the public No RSVP - Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis

Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi has gained international recognition for her nuanced, lushly colored images that offer closely observed fragments of everyday life. In 2001, Kawauchi launched her career with the simultaneous publication of three astonishing photobooks –Utatane, Hanabi and Hanako – firmly establishing herself as one of the most innovative newcomers to contemporary photography.

Kawauchi sees her work as a vast archive of images with never-ending potential. She photographs her everyday life, however it is through her selection and composition that she creates a magical feeling from her environment. Pictures of a baby being born, portraits of wounded or sick people, instantaneous and magical moments like fireworks, are all components of her visual poetry.

In her most recent body of work, Ametsuchi, Kawauchi unites images of distant constellations, tiny figures lost within landscapes, with photographs of a traditional controlled burn farming method (yakihata), in which the cycles of cultivation and recovery span decades and generations. Punctuating the series are images of Buddhist rituals and other religious ceremonies – a suggestion of other means by which humankind has traditionally attempted to transcend time and memory. Selected works from Ametsuchi are currently on view in the exhibition, A Sense of Place, at Pier 24 Photography.

Kawauchi is recognized for masterful editing and sequencing of her images to generate a rich body of photobooks. Her monographs include Aila (2004), The Eyes, the Ear (2005) and Semear (2007). In 2010, Aperture publishedIlluminance, the first book of the artist’s work published outside of Japan; she was short-listed for the 2012 Deutsche Börse Prize for this publication.

Rinko Kawauchi 'Ametsuchi' on ASX

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Review: Rinko Kawauchi Ametsuchi (2013)

By Sören Schuhmacher for ASX, September 2013

Rinko Kawauchi’s new book Ametsuchi (Heaven and Earth) published by Aperture, reads like a Haruki Murakami novel. Kawauchi merges reality with the spiritual world and reveals an invisible but tangent point of connection between apparently unrelated events. Even the concept of Ametsuchioriginates from a dream, Rinko Kawauchi had years ago.

“I was drinking my coffee on a Sunday morning, idly watching TV with my head still half-asleep, I was surprised to suddenly see the image from that dream reappear. It was a scene of many people and horses together in a green meadow before a large mountain – a place called Aso.”

Rinko Kawauchi entered a new territory with Ametsuchi. This time she worked with a 4×5 large format camera instead her Rolleiflex, which led her to break out from the self-imposed pattern of the square format. Also the typical soft tones in her images disappear. They became darker and reveal an almost mystical atmosphere.

Aso, where most of the photographs were taken, is a region famous for it’s 1,300-year-old farming ritual, in which fields are burned on an annual basis in advance of planting new crops. The agricultural burning and the cyclical nature of life, functions as the central theme in the book.

Kawauchi is known for her exceptional editing of her books and the manner to tell a story on a page by juxtaposition of two images. Although her previous books were always pursuing a certain concept, they could be considered more like a collection of short stories than a novel without an ongoing storyline. Ametsuchi on the other side, is sequenced with single images on a double page, which invites the viewer to follow the story through the entire book, from beginning to end.

The book starts with a smoke darkened sky, caused by the flames of the agriculture burning, that turn the dry fields into an apocalyptic landscape. In the further course, burning fields, green meadows and in snow covered landscapes alternate to illustrate a recurring cycle and and the elapse of time.

At about the middle of the book, images of a theatrical Shinto dance ceremony, the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, and the starry sky in a planetarium were interspersed. Different from the agricultural burnings, the images of the Wailing Wall and the Shinto dance ceremony are blurred and overexposed. The sudden appearing and disappearing of these interspersed images, are like zapping through TV channels, where different events, at different locations, take place at the same time.

At first glance this events seem unrelated, but under a closer look, they all representing a certain resistance in a time that rapidly changes. Rituals – Spiritual remains of the beginning of mankind, formed a circle by passing on from generation to generation. Ametsuchi is a veneration of the invisible world that has continued since the distant past. Rinko Kawauchi uses these rituals as a juncture between past and present, spiritual world and reality, heaven and earth.

The award-winning Dutch designer, Hans Gremmen, translated the concept of Ametsuchi into the book design, and managed even to enlarge Kawauchi’s work by pushing the photobook to the next level. Questioning the medium of the book, and how people tend to use them, Ametsuchi is bound in a variation of a Japanese binding. The upper sides of the pages are closed and the bottoms open, which generates a space between the actual pages that can only be seen by lifting the pages bottom corners up. In this almost hidden space, the images are the inverted color version from the outer surface, visualizing a parallel world, where darkness turns into light, fire into water and vice versa. As a nice extra the dust jacket of the book is also a double-sided poster with a inverted image of the cover on the back. Nothing was left to chance and is perfectly integrated into the main concept, from the beginning to the end.

This leads to the last image in the book, which shows the actual scene of people and horses together in a green meadow before a large mountain. The scene, Rinko Kawauchi dreamt about and which later reappeared on television – a recurring cycle.

“On the ground of one of the stars among the immense universe, I think of the beginning, The Earth is a mirror to project heaven. Photography captures the mirror. It connects the Earth and heaven. When the darkness reaches at the bottom, the light will arrive.”

- Rinko Kawauchi

ASX CHANNEL: RINKO KAWAUCHI

(All rights reserved. Text @ Sören Schuhmacher and ASX, Images @ Rinko Kawauchi)

an - Rinko Kawauchi

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PICTURED #3: Rinko Kawauchi, Ametsuchi

For the third instalment of our series looking at visually rich art books, we consider the delicate and meditative works of Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi, on the occasion of her latest book – Ametsuchi – published by Aperture.

BY: TIM CLARK

NEWS: 11 Jul 2013

Rinko Kawauchi’s photographs are always emerging. They show us the point of becoming or passing, the moment at which forms begin and end.

The Japanese photographer is known for her unique brand of poetic photographs that concentrate on details so obvious that they almost go unnoticed. Some of her most instantly recognisable images include a drop of milk slipping from a baby’s mouth, lightning assaulting a building, the sun winking through trees, and spider patterns in fractured glass. Her work is the product of sustained looking of the most dreamy and introspective kind. She piles melancholy on melancholy.

Now, for her latest series entitled Ametsuchi, just published as a book by Aperture, she has taken the tradition of yakihata (an agricultural practice dating back 1,300 years in which fields are burnt to prepare and enrich soil) as her starting point to explore the cycles of life – its origins, its decay and its regenerative essence.

Leafing through its pages, we are confronted with scenes of poised turbulence, full of fragility and transcience yet loaded with meaning. Flaming fields are the recurring motif, bathed in soft, almost painterly colours and shot from dynamic perspectives. It’s both a celebration and lament to the fragility and fertility of the Earth, as well as an unremitting and poignant reflection of nature’s power.

Yet, hers is a strange kind of vision, not quite total. The works are like half-images or the tenderest lines from a poem – fragmented and abstract yet somehow resolving into a whole. Indeed, her decision to include other subjects such as planetariums, night Kagura dances, the sky viewed from her home and even the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem at first glance seem discordant but, as Kawauchi states, this all part of her undulating narrative pattern.

“They all lie in a haphazard array with seemingly nothing to connect them," she says. "But when lined up on a single time axis something can be read from these things too. There is an invisible point of tangency between apparently unrelated things. I investigate the connection between dreams and reality; I consider the beginning of things.”

Ametsuchi is no masterpiece, and certainly doesn’t rank up there with her mesmerisingly beautiful Illuminance (2011) and Aila (2004) titles. But for the mere pleasure of the eye, the surer we are of her mastery – always emerging.

Ametsuchi: photographs by Rinko Kawauchi is published by Aperture Foundation. For more information click here.

Text courtesy of an

Click here to view more information

Aperture: Interview

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May 28th, 2013

Interview with Hans Gremmen, designer of Rinko Kawauchi’s Ametsuchi

On the occasion of the release of Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi’s new book, Ametsuchi, Aperture Foundation associate editor Brian Sholis spoke with Hans Gremmen, the book’s designer.

Rinko Kawauchi on press at Mart.Spruijt in The Netherlands.

Brian Sholis: You’ve worked on many photobooks, several of which deal with landscapes. Was this your first time working with a Japanese photographer? What was unique about your working relationship with Rinko Kawauchi?

Hans Gremmen: Many of the books I work on as a designer and/or editor indeed deal with the topic of the landscape. Almost always the artist approaches the landscape in a conceptual way. For instance, Cette Montagne, C’est Moi, by Witho Worms, is about the influence of the mine industry on the landscape, but it is also about photography itself, and the book is also about printing and poetry. When things come together in the right way, a publication can be about so much more thn its one ostensible topic.

This is also the case with Rinko Kawauchi’s Ametsuchi. It is a project about the changing landscape, religion, and circles of life and memory, butAmetsuchi is also very much about Rinko herself, and her relation to the medium of photography. The book itself—the way it is printed and bound—asks questions about the medium of the book, and how people tend to use them.

Rinko and Aperture publisher Lesley Martin challenged me to come up with design ideas that could make this a unique project. It was indeed my first collaboration with a Japanese photographer. But that is a great thing about photography: it tells stories, but does not speak a specific language.

BJS: Can you describe some of the “questions” you’ve asked about the medium of the book? What unusual printing and binding techniques will people discover when they encounter this book? And how do those techniques relate to Kawauchi’s photographs?

HG: The book is bound in a variation of Japanse binding. In regular Japanese binding you fold the paper in such a way that the sides are closed. In this book the closed side has moved to the top of the page; the sides and bottom are open. This results in a book that has an “parallel world” on the inside of the pages, in which some images are printed in inverted colors. By inverting the images the existential and poetic nature of Kawauchi’s work is enlarged: fire turns into water, night turns into day.

Reproductions from the book on press at Mart.Spruijt in The Netherlands.

BJS: In another interview you have spoken about how every design decision regarding a photobook should serve the photographs within it. The variation on Japanese binding is a bold, easily legible decision. Ametsuchi is also taller and narrower than many photobooks. What other, subtler design decisions characterize this project?

HG: The size of the book is very practical: it is the maximum size you can get out a sheet of paper with this way of binding. I could go a bit bigger, but that would have limited me in the choice of paper. I wanted to avoid that limitation because the paper is a very important factor in binding the book. The paper needed to be flexible (read: “thin”), but the opacity should also be high. Otherwise the inverted images would interfere too much with the images on the other side of the paper. We made tests with and without images printed on the back, to see what the effect on the photographs would be; and with the paper we ultimately chose, there was no effect.

The endpapers and dustjacket are printed on a special paper as well; a paper which is rough on one side, smooth on the other. The design of this book looks for opposites—on various levels. This reflects in the choice of paper, in the way the images are inverted, but also in typography. On the book’s case, the artist’s name is printed upside down.

The design of this book also refers to a cycle. The book begins and ends Rinko’s name, which appears on both “ends” fo the dust jacket, and the title of the book likewise appears on the first and last pages of the book. Also the image on the endpapers repeats, as does the typography on the case. For this book I sought to make its major themes visible not only in the standout decisions, but also its many small details.

Text and images courtesy of Aperture.

artbook: Rinko Kawauchi

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DATE: 6/11/2013 | BY ERIN C. DUNIGAN

Rinko Kawauchi: Playing with Fire

Featured image, by rising Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi, is reproduced from her recently released photobook, Ametsuchi, published by Aperture. This powerful image captures the centuries-old Japanese tradition of farming with fire, or yakihata. Fittingly, themes of regeneration and rebirth, and the transcendence of time and memory, play an important role in Kawauchi’s new book. As with her previous publication, Illuminance, Kawauchi presents intensely moving images, lushly colored fragments of everyday life. In this gorgeous new volume the reader is at once transported to the heavens, earth, stars and mountains; the result is a moving meditation on the beauty and ephemerality of existence. This balance is further enhanced by the publication's stunning design. According to the book’s designer, Hans Gremmen, an unusual variation on Japanese binding "introduces a 'parallel world' on the inside of the pages... By inverting the images, the existential and poetic nature of Kawauchi’s work is enlarged: fire turns into water, night turns into day." For more on Ametsuchi's unique design, see Brian Sholis' interview withHans Gremmen on the Aperture blog.

Text courtesy of artbook.

Artweek.LA - Rinko Kawauchi

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Rinko Kawauchi - Ametsuchi

Rinko Kawauchi doesn’t think of her photography as documentation.  Though her subjects are drawn from the tangible world around her, she is driven to take pictures by a belief in mystery, a love for things in motion, and a curiosity about the connectivity of everything she sees.  Through the medium of photography she attempts to confront and comprehend what she finds puzzling about existence and to transcend the unavoidable flow of time by concentrating on a particular moment, which is neither past nor future.

For her latest body of work, Ametsuchi (Heaven and Earth), the artist has expanded her view of time and memory both figuratively and literally.  She put aside her signature 6 x 6 inch Rolleiflex in favor of the more labor-intensive 4 x 5 camera and set out to explore the origins of civilization and culture.  The results are photographs on a grand scale that focus on sacred time, ritual, and collective memory.  The artist writes:

“I had a dream.  I think it was probably six or seven years ago.  I remembered the dream clearly because the internal scene was so powerful, so beautiful, it was almost scary.  About six months later, as I was drinking my coffee on a Sunday morning, idly watching TV with my head still half-asleep, I was surprised to suddenly see the image from that dream reappear.  It was a scene of many people and horses together in a green meadow before a large mountain – a place called Aso.”

Kawauchi made her first pilgrimage to Aso, in Japan’s Kumamoto Prefecture, in March of 2008.  The cold, cloudy weather had kept tourists away, and the lush green field of her dream was now grassland, scorched and enveloped in flames.  But it was there, in a solitary moment, on a vast stretch of land that she felt for the first time, the overwhelming sensation that she was standing on an actual planet and experienced the illusion that she herself had been burned up and reborn anew.  For five years following, the artist returned to the region during various seasons and captured not only the visually dramatic yakihata, (the ritual burning of the fields in Spring), but the renewal of life there as well.

In Ametsuchi the artist presents the field burning at Aso and the cyclical nature of life as a central motif.  Along with this ritual, which has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years, Kawauchi also includes images of three other subjects, which emphasize ancient ideas of time, motion, interconnectedness, and the confluence of heaven and earth:  the Shiromi Kagura festival (a theatrical Shinto dance ceremony in the Miyazaki Prefecture), scenes of people praying at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, and abstract drawings made with a laser pointer on a starry planetarium ceiling.

Born in Shiga, Japan in 1972, Rinko Kawauchi is celebrated for her unique contributions to photography in both her native country and worldwide.  After graduating from Seian of Art in 1993, Kawauchi worked as a freelance photographer for several years before creating a sensation in the Japanese art world when she released a trilogy of critically acclaimed photography books in 2001 titled Utatane, Hanabi and Hanako.  In 2002 she was awarded the prestigious Kimura Ihei Award for Utatane and Hanabi.  Those publications were followed by Aila in 2004, the eyes the ears and Cui Cui, 2005, and Semear in 2007.  In 2011, her first and highly anticipated American publication, Illuminance, was released by Aperture and is now in its second printing.  Her most recent monograph, Ametsuchi,  also published by Aperture, has just been released.  Kawauchi’s work has been exhibited internationally and has been the subject of solo exhibitions at major institutions including Foundation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain, Paris; Hasselblad Centre, Göteborg; Museu de Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo; and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography.

Text courtesy of Artweek.LA

The Telegraph: Rinko Kawauchi

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Fields of fire: Rinko Kawauchi's photographs

For her latest project the Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi observed the 1,300-year-old tradition of burning farmland, an idea that came to her in a dream

By 

Untitled, from Ametsuchi by Rinko Kawauchi

In a relatively short space of time Rinko Kawauchi has achieved a level of global recognition few other Japanese photographers have managed.

Despite the subtlety and simplicity of her images, she secured in 2001, as a complete unknown, an almost unprecedented book deal. Publishing three photobooks at once, she spewed out hundreds of strange, disorienting, kaleidoscopic snapshots of stickily suggestive shapes and textures captured over the course of more than a decade, mostly around Tokyo, where she lives.

A shot that sums up this period of frenzied output is of gelatinous white fish eggs generously heaped on a teaspoon, photographed from below, a child’s perspective; it is at once innocent and knowing.

Like fields of colour in a Rothko painting, or the sparse language of a Cormac McCarthy novel, Kawauchi’s camera seeks out forms with elementary simplicity, but reframes them with an elegance that is entirely her own. The best of the three early books, Utatane (meaning siesta), was listed among the 10 most influential photobooks of the decade by the photography historian Gerry Badger in the British Journal of Photography, and Kawauchi went on to be shortlisted for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize last year.

In many ways her new project is a bold departure from the insta-snapping, compulsive style of her earlier work. For her latest photobook she adopted a larger format (now working in 4x5in), and a slower pace. The project itself has its roots in a dream. In an afterword to the book, Ametsuchi (meaning heaven and earth), she explains that while watching TV footage of farmers standing in a green meadow in the mountainous region of Japan’s largest volcano, Aso, she knew instantly that she had seen the image before – it had popped into her head while she slept, six or seven years earlier.

A Google search revealed that Aso was one of the few communities that continued a 1,300-year-old tradition of sustaining farming land by burning it on an annual basis, instead of using chemicals, before new crops are planted. 'I had long wanted to observe this ritual. I decided I had to go,’ Kawauchi wrote.

She has been visiting the region to watch the yakihata ritual since 2008. But she has retained vivid memories of that first visit.

'The force of the flames burning up the vast grassland was far stronger than I had imagined,’ she wrote. 'Witnessing the landscape completely burnt, I was seized by the illusion that I myself had burnt up. It was a refreshing sensation, as if the self that I had been up until then was no longer – that I had been reborn.’

Text courtesy of The Telegraph.

Paris Photo: Rinko Kawauchi

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Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series Ametsuchi, 2012

Click here to view additional images

RINKO KAWAUCHI

May 17, 2013 — Jun 22, 2013

ROSEGALLERY Los Angeles Fair Exhibitor

Bergamot Station Arts Center Gallery G5 2525 Michigan Avenue 90066 Santa Monica info@rosegallery.net T +1 310 264 8440 www.rosegallery.net Fax +1 310 264 8443

——

ROSEGALLERY presents the American debut of Ametsuchi, the most recent body of photographs by world-renowned Japanese photographer, Rinko Kawauchi.

Though her subjects are drawn from the tangible world around her, she is driven to take pictures by a belief in mystery, a love for things in motion, and a curiosity about the connectivity of everything she sees. Through the medium of photography she attempts to confront and comprehend what she finds puzzling about existence and to transcend the unavoidable flow of time by concentrating on a particular moment, which is neither past nor future. For her latest body of work, Ametsuchi (Heaven and Earth), the artist has expanded her view of time and memory both figuratively and literally.

She put aside her signature 6 x 6 inch Rolleiflex in favor of the more labor-intensive 4 x 5 camera and set out to explore the origins of civilization and culture. The results are photographs on a grand scale that focus on sacred time, ritual, and collective memory.

Text courtesy of Paris Photo.

Art Daily: Rinko Kawauchi's Ametsuchi

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Recent body of photographs by Japanese photographer, Rinko Kawauchi on view at Rosegallery

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series Ametsuchi, 2012. 58 x 72 inch. Lambda Print. From an edition of three. Images © Rinko Kawauchi, courtesy ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica.

SANTA MONICA, CA.- ROSEGALLERY presents the American debut of Ametsuchi, the most recent body of photographs by world-renowned Japanese photographer, Rinko Kawauchi. Large-scale photographs are on view from 17 May through 22 June, 2013. Rinko Kawauchi doesn’t think of her photography as documentation. Though her subjects are drawn from the tangible world around her, she is driven to take pictures by a belief in mystery, a love for things in motion, and a curiosity about the connectivity of everything she sees. Through the medium of photography she attempts to confront and comprehend what she finds puzzling about existence and to transcend the unavoidable flow of time by concentrating on a particular moment, which is neither past nor future. For her latest body of work, Ametsuchi (Heaven and Earth), the artist has expanded her view of time and memory both figuratively and literally. She put aside her signature 6 x 6 inch Rolleiflex in favor of the more labor-intensive 4 x 5 camera and set out to explore the origins of civilization and culture. The results are photographs on a grand scale that focus on sacred time, ritual, and collective memory. The artist writes: “I had a dream. I think it was probably six or seven years ago. I remembered the dream clearly because the internal scene was so powerful, so beautiful, it was almost scary. About six months later, as I was drinking my coffee on a Sunday morning, idly watching TV with my head still half-asleep, I was surprised to suddenly see the image from that dream reappear. It was a scene of many people and horses together in a green meadow before a large mountain – a place called Aso.” Kawauchi made her first pilgrimage to Aso, in Japan’s Kumamoto Prefecture, in March of 2008. The cold, cloudy weather had kept tourists away, and the lush green field of her dream was now grassland, scorched and enveloped in flames. But it was there, in a solitary moment, on a vast stretch of land that she felt for the first time, the overwhelming sensation that she was standing on an actual planet and experienced the illusion that she herself had been burned up and reborn anew. For five years following, the artist returned to the region during various seasons and captured not only the visually dramatic yakihata, (the ritual burning of the fields in Spring), but the renewal of life there as well. In Ametsuchi the artist presents the field burning at Aso and the cyclical nature of life as a central motif. Along with this ritual, which has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years, Kawauchi also includes images of three other subjects, which emphasize ancient ideas of time, motion, interconnectedness, and the confluence of heaven and earth: the Shiromi Kagura festival (a theatrical Shinto dance ceremony in the Miyazaki Prefecture), scenes of people praying at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, and abstract drawings made with a laser pointer on a starry planetarium ceiling. Born in Shiga, Japan in 1972, Rinko Kawauchi is celebrated for her unique contributions to photography in both her native country and worldwide. After graduating from Seian of Art in 1993, Kawauchi worked as a freelance photographer for several years before creating a sensation in the Japanese art world when she released a trilogy of critically acclaimed photography books in 2001 titled Utatane, Hanabi and Hanako. In 2002 she was awarded the prestigious Kimura Ihei Award for Utatane and Hanabi. Those publications were followed by Aila in 2004, the eyes the ears and Cui Cui, 2005, and Semear in 2007. In 2011, her first and highly anticipated American publication, Illuminance, was released by Aperture and is now in its second printing. Her most recent monograph, Ametsuchi, also published by Aperture, has just been released. Kawauchi’s work has been exhibited internationally and has been the subject of solo exhibitions at major institutions including Foundation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain, Paris; Hasselblad Centre, Göteborg; Museu de Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo; and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography.

Text courtesy of Art Daily.

Rinko Kawauchi and Martin Parr in "Aperture Remix"

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November 15, 2012

UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF APERTURE

Rinko Kawauchi, in response to Sally Mann's "Family" (1992)

For the current show “Aperture Remix: A 60th Anniversary Celebration,” the curator Lesley A. Martin commissioned ten contemporary photographers, including Rinko Kawauchi, Vik Muniz, Martin Parr, Doug Rickard, and Alec Soth, to create photographs in response to an Aperture publication they felt most influenced their development as artists. “I wanted to reflect the wide and varied range of contemporary photographic practices and to select artists working at the top of their game within their particular niche,” Martin says. The show runs through Saturday at Aperture before it goes on the road internationally. Click here to view more photographs.

Text courtesy of The New Yorker

Berlinppon: Rinko Kawauchi

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Rinko Kawauchi nominated for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012

October 12, 2012 by 

Nominated for her publication Illuminance, published by Editions Xavier Barral (France, 2011).

Hailed for her ability to turn the mundane into the extraordinary and poetic, Kawauchi’s work explores themes of life, death and the everyday.

Illuminance, the result of both commissions and personal projects, spans fifteen years of her practice. Using a soft palette of colours and masterful composition and editing skills, her images evoke moments of dreams, memory and temporality.

Text and image courtesy of berlinippon.com

Rinko Kawauchi at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

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Rinko Kawauchi:

Illuminance, Ametsuchi, Seeing Shadow

May 12 — July 16

Untitled, from the series Ametsuchi, 2012

The Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography is delighted to present the solo exhibition entitled Kawauchi Rinko: Illuminance, Ametsuchi, Seeing Shadow, devoted to the work of Kawauchi Rinko, a photographer who has exemplified the period from 2000 on, winning support largely from the younger generation, and has also achieved renown on the international stage.

This exhibition, Kawauchi Rinko's first solo exhibition at a museum in the Tokyo area, will introduce Illuminance, which mainly consists of recent work in the 6 x 6 cm format, the style of photography that is almost synonymous with this artist, as well as her latest work, Ametsuchi and Seeing Shadow, series being exhibited for the first time.

Kawauchi Rinko has spent nearly 15 years shooting the photographs that make up the Illuminance series, in which we see a deepening of themes that first appeared in her Utatane series, for which she won the 2002 Kimura Ihee Award. Here again we see, with a greater depth of style, everyday private scenes shot in a way that illuminates the universal brilliance of life. The artist's unique world of images develops spatially, mingling light and dark, life and death, beauty and sadness in a large number of momentary scenes. The new Ametsuchi and Seeing Shadow series, which include both large prints and video works, create intuitive depictions of the cosmic order, the connection between heaven and earth, primitive scenes, through a variety of earthly phenomena, including the burning off of the fields around Mt. Aso in early spring. A group of photographs photographed with a large-format 4 x 5 inch camera and presented as large-scale prints, about two meters wide, combined with an experiential video presentation on a large screen reflect a view of the world on a huge scale not seen in Kawauchi's earlier work.

The exhibition consists of approximately 80 works that present the essence and fascination of Kawauchi Rinko's creative cosmos and draws close to new developments.

Untitled, from the series Illuminance, 2009
Untitled, from the series Illuminance, 2007
Text courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

Rinko Kawauchi will be showing at Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

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2F Exhibition Gallery

Untitled, from the series of Ametsuchi 2012

Kawauchi Rinko: Illuminance, Ametsuchi, Seeing Shadow

May 12 (Sat) - July 16 (Mon)

The Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography is delighted to present the solo exhibition entitled Kawauchi Rinko: Illuminance, Ametsuchi, Seeing Shadow, devoted to the work of Kawauchi Rinko, a photographer who has exemplified the period from 2000 on, winning support largely from the younger generation, and has also achieved renown on the international stage.

This exhibition, Kawauchi Rinko's first solo exhibition at a museum in the Tokyo area, will introduce Illuminance, which mainly consists of recent work in the 6 x 6 cm format, the style of photography that is almost synonymous with this artist, as well as her latest work, Ametsuchi and Seeing Shadow, series being exhibited for the first time.

Kawauchi Rinko has spent nearly 15 years shooting the photographs that make up the Illuminance series, in which we see a deepening of themes that first appeared in her Utatane series, for which she won the 2002 Kimura Ihee Award. Here again we see, with a greater depth of style, everyday private scenes shot in a way that illuminates the universal brilliance of life. The artist's unique world of images develops spatially, mingling light and dark, life and death, beauty and sadness in a large number of momentary scenes. The new Ametsuchi and Seeing Shadow series, which include both large prints and video works, create intuitive depictions of the cosmic order, the connection between heaven and earth, primitive scenes, through a variety of earthly phenomena, including the burning off of the fields around Mt. Aso in early spring. A group of photographs photographed with a large-format 4 x 5 inch camera and presented as large-scale prints, about two meters wide, combined with an experiential video presentation on a large screen reflect a view of the world on a huge scale not seen in Kawauchi's earlier work.

The exhibition consists of approximately 80 works that present the essence and fascination of Kawauchi Rinko's creative cosmos and draws close to new developments.

Untitled, from the series of Illuminance 2007

Untitled, from the series of Illuminance 2009

Please see more at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography website

Rinko Kawauchi Nominated for Deutsche Börse Photography Prize

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Deutsche Börse Photography PrizeThe Deutsche Börse Photography Prize aims to reward a contemporary photographer of any nationality, who has made the most significant contribution (exhibition or publication) to the medium of photography in Europe in the previous year.

The Prize was originally set up in 1996 by The Photographers' Gallery in London to promote the best of contemporary photography. Deutsche Börse has sponsored the £30,000 prize since 2005. The Prize showcases new talents and highlights the best of international photography practice. It is one of the most prestigious prizes in the world of photography. The Photographers’ Gallery and Deutsche Börse were shortlisted for Arts & Business International Award 2008 for their cooperation in the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012

The four shortlisted artists for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 are Pieter Hugo, Rinko Kawauchi, John Stezaker and Christopher Williams. Work by the shortlisted photographers will be shown in an exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery, Summer 2012, followed by its presentations at C/O Berlin, Forum for visual dialogs and at the Deutsche Börse headquarters in Frankfurt.

The Jury

The Deutsche Börse Photography Prize candidates are nominated by the Academy, a group of more than one hundred international experts of photographic art. Each Academy member nominates one contemporary photographer of any nationality. An international jury which is newly assembled each year choses four finalists from among the nominated photographers, one of which is then determined the winner. The members of the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012 jury are: François Hébel (Director, Les Rencontres d'Arles), Martin Parr (artist, UK), Beatrix Ruf (Director/Curator, Kunsthalle Zürich) and Anne-Marie Beckmann (Curator, Art Collection Deutsche Börse, Germany). Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, is the non-voting Chair.

The shortlisted artists

Pieter Hugo (born 1976, South-Africa) is nominated for his publication Permanent Error, published by Prestel (Germany, 2011). Permanent Error (2011), Pieter Hugo’s latest publication, centres on a vast dumping ground for technological waste on the outskirts of Ghana’s capital city. Focusing on the young slum-dwellers who are burning the discarded, industrial rubbish to survive, Hugo’s stark photographs of this bleak landscape expose the consequences and ethics of disposal of the West’s consumption of ever-new technology.

Image: Pieter Hugo, Yakubu Al Hasan, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana 2009

Rinko Kawauchi (born 1972, Japan) is nominated for her publication Illuminance, published by Kehrer (Germany, 2011).                             In her work, Rinko Kawauchi creates an imaginary space where the fantastical is possible – evoking moments of dreams, memory and temporality. The images in her book Illuminance (2011), the results of both commissions and personal projects, span fifteen years of her practice and have the ability to turn the mundane into the extraordinary and poetic.

Image: Untitled from the series 'Illuminance', 2009

John Stezaker (born 1949, UK) is nominated for his exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (29 January – 18 March 2011). Spanning more than 40 years, John Stezaker’s collages re-examine the multi-facetted relationships we have to the photographic image. Through his elegant and often perplexing juxtapositions of appropriated images found in books, magazines, and postcards, Stezaker adopts the content and contexts of the original images to convey his own witty and poignant meanings.

Image: John Stezaker, Marriage (Film Portrait Collage) XLIII 2007, © John Stezaker

Christopher Williams (born 1956, USA) is nominated for his exhibition Kapitalistischer Realismus at Dům umění České Budějovice, Budweis, Czech Republic (5 May – 12 June 2011).                                                                                                                                                                     As much conceptual artist as photographer, Christopher Williams has been creating images of cameras, models, vehicles and other technical apparatus for the last 40 years. Alluding to and borrowing from the world of commercial photography he continuously questions what can constitute a photograph and how much the actual visual content of that photograph matters.

Image: Bergische Bauernscheune, Junkersholz, Leichlingen, September 29th, 2009

Photographmag - Rinko Kawauchi: Illuminance Book review by Vince Aletti

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Rinko Kawauchi’s Illuminance (Aperture) could be the year’s most beautiful photo book. Her 12th since 2001, when she published three books simultaneously, it’s culled from 15 years of work and loosely tied to the theme of light. Typically, her subjects are both ordinary and extraordinary: a burning cigarette, a suckling baby, a dead bird, a drop of water on a lily pad, a lunar eclipse. In a sequence of radiant color images that feels at once deliberate and random, she strikes an ideal balance between weight and weightlessness, the concrete and the ephemeral. David Chandler, the book’s elegant essayist, identifies Kawauchi’s “highly personal, insatiably hungry form of photography, both euphoric and startled,” as part of “a new kind of visual communication, a new language...that is diaristic, uninhibited, interpersonal, and emotionally charged.” But he also places her squarely within the Japanese photo-book tradition that gives publications priority over exhibitions. With Illuminance, Kawauchi clarifies what Chandler calls her “spirit of accelerated wonder,” summing up her considerable achievement while leaving it marvelously expansive and open-ended.

FOIL Editor Interviews Rinko Kawauchi

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Masakazu Takei, an editor and the representative of FOIL Publishing interviews photographer Rinko Kawauchi after working with her on a number of books with FOIL and Little More Publishing

When did you begin studying photography?

I attended a two-year college and took a photography class once a week, which I enjoyed more than anything else.

Did you intend to become a photographer when you entered college?

No. I went to art school because I thought it would be fun to take art class every day. I was interested in studying drawing, design and images. But what I enjoyed the most was my photography class.

What did you do just after graduating from college?

I was employed by an advertising company and worked in the photography section only for a year. After that, I worked as an assistant at a photography rental studio in Tokyo for about one and a half years. The first year I spent most of my time shooting packaging and works of art. This experience helped me learn a lot about technique. After about three years working for others, I decided to go free lance.

As a free lance photographer did you work more for advertising or for magazines?

In the beginning I worked more for advertising. However I have had many different types of clients including magazines.

Your first publications were the trilogy of photo books Utatane, Hanabi and Hanako. As a free lance shooting commercial work, when did you find the time to work on personal projects such as Utatane?

Well, sometimes I would work on my personal projects during the spare time I had between each job. At other times, I would shoot what caught my eye while working on a advertising project. I always carried a camera with me just in case.

Do you have a different approach to photography when you are doing your personal work?

I've been often asked that question. When I am shooting there is no difference in my approach whether I am doing personal work or commercial work. However when I am selecting them and putting them together, I do think about where and how the prints will be shown. For commercial photos, I sometimes have to shoot subjects that are set up in a studio, so perhaps I should say there is a difference with my personal work. I have a much clearer intention in mind when I am doing commercial work. But even when I am working on an advertisement, I am looking for the same kind of feelings and sensations as I am shooting.

When you shoot, do you have any specific plans?

It depends on the series. Generally, I have a potential book in mind. For Utatane, I took pictures of things that moved me. For Hanabi, I had something very specific in mind. I searched for the times and places of summer fireworks shows in Japan. I wanted to photograph them from many different points of view. I often shoot with the idea of a project in mind: a view from a hotel room, a view of the highway. Then I work on the layout of my publication.

What do you think about while you are shooting?

Basically I try not to think about anything.

Like athletes who can move their bodies without thinking?

Sometimes I am thinking as I shoot, but the best photos are brought about when I am not thinking about anything ?when my mind is empty of thought. When I am intently concentrated, I feel nothing of myself. I think it's similar to "runner's high".

Do you have this same feeling when you are putting together a series?

As I am printing, I always think about how I will put together a series ?at this stage my mind and my body are working together. I sometimes have a hard time finding an idea, but after several days of printing and reflection an idea will come to me suddenly.

Everyone says that you have a very unique way of capturing light on your prints. What do you think?

I do not do this consciously.

Sometimes your shots are deliberately en contre-jour?

Atmosphere and lighting are very important to me. When I photograph en contre-jour, what I am trying to do is capture the soul or aura of the subject rather than the subject itself... I guess that is the reason why people say that my lighting is unique.

In your work, you often address the universal themes of life and of death. Are these themes particularly important to you?

I do not necessarily think about them consciously while I am shooting. They emerge as I select the prints and put them together as a series. This is a very important process to me, as important as the shooting process. I look at my works objectively and calmly during this stage.

Are there moments during a shoot when you are sure that you have taken a great photograph? Or moments during the development when you are surprised by something you discover on a print?

I love it when I discover something extraordinary in my prints while developing. There are always moments when I surprise myself by seeing something I did not expect to find.

After you develop a photograph, you reexamine it and decide how you will include it within a series of images? This could be called an editorial approach to photography.

Sometimes I feel that it would be better not to do this. If you think too much about the selection of photographs and how they will be put together, the result will seem over-structured, artificially composed. It is always difficult to use good judgment during this process.

How do photography books differ from exhibitions?

The biggest difference is that a photography book can be held in your hands. It can thus be appreciated on a more intimate level. Exhibitions are seen in white boxes. When you are putting together a photography book, you must keep in mind that you look at them in a sequential way as you turn the pages. When viewing an exhibition, what counts most is the space and how it is structured. These are two very different ways of looking at photographs.

In your exhibitions, you often present a selection of photographs in a small box-like room.

When possible I like people to view the images in a very small space. In this way, the public is brought closer to the work.

The experience thus becomes similar to viewing the photographs in photography book.

Up until now, I have been mainly focused on making publications. It is probably for this reason that I like people to view my works up close. Although I know there are many advantages to showing my work in larger spaces, I still believe it is more suited for smaller spaces. For this reason, I always make sure that there is a small room where people can appreciate the work on a more intimate level. The one I made for the exhibition at Art Tower Mito was called a confession room, which was well described.

It was like a church?

It owed the effect to the height of the ceiling and the way the sunlight streamed into the room. When I am shooting, I appreciate the same kind of atmosphere. I want to create a quiet, intimate place where people can be alone and listen to their inner voices while they are looking at my works.

What were your interests as a child?

I wasn't a very cheerful child. I was rather gloomy. I didn't like school. I was always reading books, but they were nothing serious - fairy tales, illustrated children's books, novels for young women, and world literature.

Do you enjoy reading?

I like books. Even if I don't understand the content, I am happy just having them. I love libraries. Since there were not many books in my school library, I often went to the municipal library in Tsurumi Ward(Osaka) by bicycle. I like being by myself in the library.

Did you look at any photography books when you were a child?

Yes. I saw American Roulette of Shinya Fujiwara when I was in elementary school. I couldn't understand why he had given that title to his book of photographs of the US. I tried to read the postscript, but it was too difficult for me to understand. I also saw his publication Memento-Mori as well as Joji Hashiguchi's 17 years old and couple. I was also interested in photographs of animals in nature books. I remember being particularly surprised by the texts in Hashiguchi's couple. I was even reading Osamu Hashimoto and Seiko Tanabe. Once, a young librarian told me that I was too young to be reading such books. I didn't care and just kept reading them even though I didn't always understand them.

Who are the photographers that you particularly respect and why?

In Japan, I respect Kyoji Takahashi, Toyohisa Araki, Daido Moriyama and Takuma Nakahira. In Europe, I respect Boris Mikhailov. I also like the works of Wolfgang Tillmans. I generally respect the work of all photographers.

Have you been influenced by anyone?

Though there are many people, Banana Yoshimoto has influenced the spiritual part of me very much. I was also influenced by the work of Satoru Sato, a great illustrator of children's books.

It is very difficult for young artists abroad to publish their books before they exhibit their works, while in Japan young artists can publish their work relatively easily. What do you think of this difference in opportunities?

It has been my first goal to publish books. It has been more important to me than making an exhibition. Even when I knew my work would not be published, I did not consider it completed until I was finished organizing it into portfolios. Before I published my first book, I was making my own handmade books every half a year or so. It was very important for me to unify my works into a series before moving on to the next stage. For me an exhibition is a reward, not a goal in and of itself. I think that if I was not able to publish my work, I would continue making books on my own. It is more important to me to show my works in the form of a book than to show the print itself.

You simultaneously released three photography books in Japan. Did your situation change following the release of these publications?

It completely changed my life. It means that I am now appreciated as an artist. You are not recognized as an artist in Japan unless you have published something. People place more importance on your publications than on your exhibitions. For the selection of Annual Kimura Ihei Award, what they consider is the publications.

For this exhibition, you will show the photographs from AILA, the eyes, the ears, and cui, cui. What does each titles mean?

AILA comes from the Turkish word meaning ig family?or more generally relationship? the eyes, the ears, is about what can be captured with our five senses; not only what the eyes see, but also what the ear hears and the skin touches.

the eyes, the ears, represents your first experience bringing together your photos and your poems?

Organizing the photographs has gone smoothly because I usually listen to my inner voice when I am doing this. I have had many offers from various magazines to write, but I have always been a little reluctant to put words next to my images. I tried to express my inner voice as well in my poems as I do in my photographs. It was also a challenge for me to do things in a new way.

The AILA series not only deals with the themes of birth and death, it also includes scenes from everyday life. Why did you include these images in this series?

If I had not included these scenes from the everyday, the series would have been cut off from reality. I included them to make daily reality more tangible. As a result, the series became more interesting.

Why did you choose cui cui as a title?

Since I knew the exhibition would take place in France, I consulted a French dictionary. There was a column about how birds cry in various languages. It is "chun, chun" in Japanese and "cui, cui" in French, and so on. Among them, "cui, cui" sounded very cute, while the sound of "chun, chun" was too familiar for me. As it is a photobook of my family, I didn't want it to have a weighty meaning. In this regard, the sound of "cui, cui" was exotic and suitable for the title.

How long have you been taking the photographs of your family?

For about 10 years. It is really a quite an average family. Although there are dramas in the life of any family, I didn't want to focus on this aspect of things in cui cui. There is nothing exceptionally dramatic shown in this series. I wanted to consider the events that can happen to any family. I thus tried to avoid focusing on the specific qualities or personality of my own family. For me, these events are sometimes as small and insignificant as the cry of a sparrow. People die, live, get married, grow apart... I hope that after seeing my work people will begin to reexamine their own families. But it was very difficult to put the series together.

What was difficult for you?

I tried to be objective, but this was very difficult because the images concern my own family. I felt that in order to merit a presentation and publication, the work had to be more than just a personal family album. I wanted to make a book that would bring people to reflect upon their own family relationships. More generally, I would like that my work serve as a catalyst for people to think about themselves and their relationship to the world.

There are a great many photographs in the size of 6x6. Are there any reason for it? What kind of camera do you use?

I use Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera in 6x6 format.

Do you use any other camera?

I use Hasselblad 6x6 and Canon A1 and F1 once in a while. Also Kyocera T Proof, a compact camera and Panon Widelux, a panoramic camera. And I want to use 4x5 format from now on.

Do you change your equipment when you go from a commercial shoot to your personal work?

I rarely change them. I judge on a case-by-case basis. But I don't change the equipment I carry. When I go on location, people are always surprized at my very small luggage. I bought a suitcase only a year ago or so. I used to go abroad with a small camera bag and a backpack. As for the tripod, I only have a small one.

I believe that you will be doing more and more exhibitions abroad from now on. How do you feel about this?

I am grateful for having many opportunities. They are like rewards to me as I've explained before. I think I'm very fortunate that my works will be seen by many people. I would like to work on each exhibition earnestly and steadily.

Text and images courtesy of Baidu.

Rinko Kawauchi: Illuminance at Hermes

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Friday, 10 June, 2011

Blog Post Courtesy of DLK Collection

JTF (just the facts): A total of 15 large scale color photographs, framed in white with no mat, and hung in the atrium gallery space at the top of the store. All of the works are chromogenic prints made between 1009 and 2011. The prints on display are square format, each 40 x 40; no edition information was available. A monograph of this body of work is forthcoming from Aperture.

Comments/Context: Every time I see Rinko Kawauchi's work, I am reminded that photography has not lost its ability to capture the pure unadulterated wonder of the world around us. Her images of seemingly mundane objects and fleeting moments are radical in their effortless simplicity and genuine freshness, her optimistic curiosity discovering child-like interest in things most of us would pass by without a second glance. Her shows have the effect of stripping away jadedness and cynicism, taking us back to a view of the world that is more naturally engaged and actively inquisitive.

What I like about this newest selection of images is that they have been edited with much tighter hand, making the whole much more thematically coherent than previous shows I've seen, which have tended to wander with more randomness from subject to subject. Virtually all the pictures on this view turn on their use of light. What might seem like a ridiculously overused photographic construct actually works here, as the images sparkle with flashes and beams of immaculate whiteness, on surfaces, in the air, and through the frame. Kawauchi's light glistens through watery mist, glances off a scooter side mirror, stripes a sidewalk, gets lost in the smoke of fireworks, slips through the forest, and passes through a transparent bubble. She jumps from the immensity of a solar eclipse to the minuteness of a tiny frog perched on a thumb, touching the tenderness of a dead swallow and the poetry of a swirling sea in between.

Regardless of her subject, Kawauchi never seems to lose sight of delicacy and openness. At first, a blast of flash against an ordinary pink rose at night seems harsh and amateurish; look again and it has a quiet haze that is quite remarkable. Even shots that might be mistaken for stock photography are somehow infused with her life affirming attention; it's like we are being taught to see all over again. Kawauchi's work doesn't fit into any neat categories or curatorial frameworks; hers is an authentically original vision, and this well chosen small show is evidence of the power of an alternate viewpoint.

Collector's POV: This isn't a selling show, so no prices were available. Kawauchi's work has only recently entered the secondary markets; with only a few lots sold in various sizes, it's hard to draw many pricing trends from so few outcomes. As a result, gallery retail is still the best option for interested collectors. I don't believe Kawauchi has gallery representation in New York at the moment, so FOIL Gallery in Tokyo will be the place to go.

Interview with Rinko Kawauchi

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Rinko Kawauchi's Silky Bliss

By Brienne Walsh, Interview Magazine

UNTITLED FROM "ILLUMINANCE," 2009.

On the top floor of the Hermès store on Madison Avenue, past shelves of signature silk scarves and leather accessories, hangs "Illuminance," a new body of work by the Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi. Bathed in the sun from the skylight at the top of the curling white stairs, in a setting that mimics the top-floor galleries of the iconic Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright, the fifteen works in the show exude a sense of calm, a zen-like attention to small details and muted colors. "I spend my life itself in photography," Kawauchi told Interview. "Place itself doesn't matter to me so much as the image that emerges."

Captured in various cities over the past 15 years, and shot from the hip with a finder Rolliflex camera, the untitled works, taken mostly without a flash, are marked by their luminescence. Depicting seemingly unconnected subjects—a small, dead bird lying on a pristine white background; a group of people emerging from a doorway onto a color flushed garden from the dark shadows of an unlit room; a man standing on an outcropping of rock over a moon-bathed ocean—the study of light itself seems to be the unifying theme of the body of work. In one image, shot in 2009, the headlight beams reflected off of the side-view mirror of a moped obscure the faint outlines of the city street behind it, an effect that blinds the viewer and captures the optical layering that occurs when an eye adjusts to the flat darkness of night. In contrast, an image taken in 2009 flattens pinpoints of purple, pink and turquoise lights, which blur across the two-dimensional composition like expressive, free form gestures of the hands, or a diffusion of comets.

Kawauchi is a member of an emerging group of female Japanese artists, which includes Chiho Aoshima and Eye Ohashi, whose work is increasingly gaining notoriety on the international stage. In opposition to her Japanese male contemporaries such as Nobuyoshi Araki, whose photography is characterized by an aggressive fetish for the subjugation of the female body, and Hiroshima Sugimoto, whose precise black-and-white compositions harness monumental spaces with a burly, almost masculine confidence, Kawauchi's works are, at surface level, distinctively feminine. That is, if femininity can be defined by almost medieval notions of softness and unassuming passivity, a characterization that the artist herself rejects.  "There may be things that only a female can express, but in my works, it something that comes out naturally," she explains. "I'm not doing it consciously."

Text and images courtesy of Interview Magazine.

Rinko Kawauchi: Illuminance

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Rinko Kawauchi: Illuminance will open at the Gallery at Hermès on 20 May, 2011 and run through 16 July, 2011. This will be the first time this work has been exhibited in a solo show in the United States. Along with the Hermès exhibition, Aperture will release a full illustrated catalogue, which will be the first time Kawauchi's work will be published outside of Japan.

To celebrate this release, Aperture will be hosting an artist talk and book signing on Wednesday 18 May, 2011 in New York City, where Kawauchi will discuss her previously unpublished images with Aperture's Book Publisher Lesley Martin.

Image © Rinko Kawauchi.