Filtering by Tag: Paris Photo

Martin Parr 'The Non-Conformists' on TIME LightBox

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We are pleased to announce that we will be showing selections from 'The Non-Conformists' at Paris Photo this year. We hope you can join us and see this fantastic work in person! Not going to be in Paris? Visit TIME LightBox to view some a slideshow of selected works from this series. To purchase a copy of The Non-Conformists, click here.

“In the 70s, in Britain, if you were going to do serious photography, you were obliged to work in black-and-white,” master photographer Martin Parr tells TIME. “Color was the palette of commercial photography and snapshot photography.”

“It’s only late in the decade that we began to see color photographers being shown in museums — like Eggleston and Stephen Shore,” he adds. “I took note of that and got excited.”

A few years later, in 1982, Parr made the switch from monochrome and never went back. To the many fans who have come to know his work over the last three decades in color, it may come as a surprise encountering Parr’s first major project in black-and-white. The Non-Conformists finally finds closure over 35 years after it was started with the publication this month of his latest monograph from Aperture.

It was 1975, and two years out of art school, Parr moved from the gritty, bustling city of Manchester to a picturesque mill town in the English countryside called Hebden Bridge. There, he found a traditional way of life in decline. Factories were closing, industry was leaving and the town was gentrifying. A new community was emerging made up of  “incomers — youthful artistic refugees… in search of alternative lifestyles and cheap housing,” Parr’s wife Susie writes in her introduction to the book.

With four other artists, he opened up a storefront workshop and darkroom in the middle of town. Equipped with a Leica and a single lens, he took to the streets and began one of his earliest extended photographic studies.

“Places change all the time and the type of people who live there change. I was not so much looking at the new incomers,” of which he was a part, “but at the traditional lifestyle there.”

He would wander around, attend events listed in the local paper, and on Sundays, go to services at the Non-Conformist churches which were all over town. In these chapels, which had historically distanced themselves from the rules of the Church of England, he and his wife, who had been working on an accompanying text for his pictures, found the focus for the body of work.

“There’s a certain independent spirit these Non-Conformists have, which not only gave the chapels their names,” — like the Mount Zion Strict and Particular Baptist Chapel — “but was also very emblematic of the fading attitude of the whole place,” he says.

Parr’s photographs in which he aimed to capture that attitude reveal a greatly skilled young documentary photographer with a keen eye for British quirk, anticipating the tremendously poignant sense of humor for which he has become known. There is great wit in these images, but it’s more subtle and less sardonic than his later saturated color work; it seems above all, affectionate.

“Black-and-white is certainly more nostalgic, by nature,” he says. “My black-and-white work is more of a celebration and the color work became more of a critique of society.”

Parr and his wife, whom he had married in Hebden Bridge, became very active in the community during their documentation, if at first only to gain trust and access. Some church members mistook their interest as one in keeping the chapel life going in the future.  The documentation came to an end, however, and the Parrs moved on. By the late 90s, most of the chapels had closed and the communities disappeared. Hebden Bridge today, “sandblasted and quaint,” his wife writes, “is a lesbian stronghold and a lively commuter town to professionals working in Leeds, Bradford and Manchester.”

“We did this photographic documentation and that’s all that’s left,” Parr says. “Virtually everyone in the photographs is dead now. It was just another era. But that’s the great thing about photographs; they’re there forever.”


Martin Parr is a British documentary photographer, photojournalist and photobook collector. The Non-Conformists is available through Aperture from October 2013. The work will also be on view at Media Space in London through March 16, 2014. Read more: http://lightbox.time.com/2013/10/21/the-non-conformists-martin-parrs-early-work-in-black-and-white/#ixzz2iUBJNHSX

Mark Cohen's new exhibition 'Dark Knees' reviewed in TimeOut Paris

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Time Out says:

In the 1970s, when Mark Cohen began to take his first pictures, ‘street photography’ dominated the American photographic scene. This Pennsylvanian native appropriated the movement while putting his own spin on it: instinct. Without conforming, his camera always at the ready, Cohen pinched bits of ideas from his contemporaries and reassembled the pieces into an infinite puzzle.

Hands, shoulders, legs and mouths mix together like a kaleidoscopic portrait, brave and immediate. Sometimes rendered sepulchral by the shock of the flash, other times touched with a strange overtones, as if his lens managed to capture what the eye didn’t have time to see, his impulsive images always surprise. They see reality differently and tell, in counter-relief, the decline of a small mining town.

To read the article on the TimeOut Paris site, please click here.

Paris Photo 2013 Agenda: Bruce Davidson Los Angeles 1964/2012

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Bruce Davidson first came to Los Angeles in 1964 on assignment for Esquire magazine. As a young New Yorker in LA, he found himself at odds with what he described as a “cultural desert with acrid air, bumper-to-bumper traffic, tall palms, and seedy Hollywood types.” Davidson approached this foreign landscape with the sardonic eye of an outsider looking in. The resulting images, shot with a 35mm camera, play with archetypes and stereotypes of the city with a quick and clever irony: bodybuilders and starlets; sunbathers and signwavers; the similarly glimmering cars and glistening surf of a beach parking lot; desperate hopefuls walking the streets in search of something more.

Nearly 45 years after Davidson first visited Los Angeles, he returned to the city with a vastly different shooting agenda. The crowded and buzzing social landscape of 1964 now serves as a distant backdrop for the quiet integrity of Davidson’s clawed up yuccas, attenuated palms, and parched hillsides. The Nature of LA looks at plant life and the politics of water in Los Angeles with a newfound compassion and patience. Using a 4x5 view camera on a tripod slows his photographic process and allows these contemplative images to take shape. The word nature’s dual meaning— both flora and fauna, and character or temperament—situates the work within a broader scope than straight photographic representation. The series speaks to man’s impact on the land and nature’s prevailing will. He writes, “hundreds of towering palm trees reach to the sky and give poetic posture to concrete freeways, tacky strip malls, and the endless grid of local streets.” No longer at odds with a foreign landscape, Davidson lets the “pockets of beauty” emerge from the so-called “cultural desert” of his youth.

In the intervening years between these bodies of work, the culture of Los Angeles has not changed significantly, but rather the artist’s experience of it. This exhibition marries the two series, the wry and the romantic, to present a multifaceted portrait of our city.

To view the Paris Photo Agenda post and see what other participants are up to, click here.

Paris Photo VIP Trip

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Aperture Foundation Paris Photo Patron Trip*

Wednesday, November 14–Sunday, November 18, 2012

Book your reservation now! Join us for an exclusive insiders’ tour of the world’s leading photography fair

Clockwise from top left: Grand Palais exterior © Marc Domage; Lise Sarfati, Vinny-Ann, Hollywood Boulevard, 2010, from the series On Hollywood, © Lise Sarfati, courtesy Rose Gallery, Los Angeles, and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York; Raphaël Dallaporta, Yellow Bile, 2007, Cibachrome edition of 3, © Raphaël Dallaporta, courtesy L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York; Manuel Álvarez Bravo, La hija de los danzantes, Cholula, Puebla, 1933, © Manuel Álvarez Bravo; Raphaël Dallaporta, Saint-Sulpice, Paris VI, 2009, Cibachrome print, edition of 6, © Raphaël Dallaporta, courtesy L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York
Our guests will gain exceptional access to Paris Photo at the Grand Palais and all VIP activities organized by the fair exclusively for our group:

  • Private tour of the exhibition Manuel Álvarez Bravo: Un photographe aux aguets (1902–2002) at the Jeu de Paume with museum director Marta Gili
  • Exclusive viewings of private collections and visits with internationally renowned photographers, including Lise Sarfati and Raphaël Dallaporta
  • The announcement of the first Paris Photo–Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards
  • Cocktail receptions; a celebratory dinner at Hotel Le Meurice; and much more!

Reservations available until Friday, October 12, 2012. Book now to receive Aperture’s special group rate for luxurious accommodations at Hotel Le Meurice.

*These activities are exclusively offered to Aperture Trustees and Patrons, with a supplemental incidentals charge of $350 per person. Airfare and accommodations not included.

For more information and to join our Patron Program, visit www.aperture.org, contact us at (212) 946-7108, or e-mail development@aperture.org.

ROSEGALLERY at PARIS PHOTO 2011

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ROSEGALLERY

Booth C21

Grand Palais

Avenue Winston Churchill

75008 Paris

10th -13th November 2011

Grand Palais Avenue Winston Churchill 75008 Paris

Dates: 10th -13th November 2011 Opening: 9 Nov. 2011 (by invitation only)

Hours: Thursday 10 Nov. - Sunday 13 Nov. noon – 8pm (7pm on Sunday) Late opening on Friday: 9.30pm