Filtering by Tag: Memphis

William Eggleston: the stories that inspired David Lynch's favourite photographer

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.
 Untitled, c.1975 (Marcia Hare in Memphis Tennessee) by William Eggleston CREDIT: EGGLESTON ARTISTIC TRUST

 Untitled, c.1975 (Marcia Hare in Memphis Tennessee) by William Eggleston CREDIT: EGGLESTON ARTISTIC TRUST

By Lucy Davies

By his own count, William Eggleston has taken somewhere between one and two million photographs, though only ever one of each scene. “I have a personal rule: never more than one picture,” he says, “and I have never wished I had taken a picture differently. It simply happens that I was right to begin with.”

Eggleston, now 76, speaks with the courtly lilt of a man born and raised in the tattered decadence of a 12,000-acre plantation in Memphis, Tennessee. Since he began taking pictures in the Sixties, photography has been his sole occupation, which explains the size of his oeuvre, but not its quality, which has enraptured viewers in the intervening years.

For full article please visit The Telegraph

 

A Road Less Traveled: How William Eggleston Transformed Photography in America

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

ARTSY EDITORIAL
BY ABIGAIL CAIN
JUL 22ND, 2016 10:35 AM

William Eggleston Untitled, 1965/2012 Gagosian Gallery

William Eggleston
Untitled, 1965/2012
Gagosian Gallery

William Eggleston Morton, Mississippi , 1969-1970  ROSEGALLERY

William Eggleston
Morton, Mississippi , 1969-1970
ROSEGALLERY

William Eggleston has no trouble pinpointing the first of his color photographs that he considers a success. It was 1965, late afternoon, and the American photographer was standing outside a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee. The warm sunlight had just caught the blonde hair and absentminded expression of a teenaged employee, who was dutifully organizing shopping carts. Eggleston aimed his camera and moved in close. Click. The resulting image embodies, in many ways, his eventual photographic practice—inconsequential moments in the American South, captured in such a manner that the colors practically glow.

Please visit Artsy for complete read. 

Memphis Made Man, William Eggleston, in detail by Andrew Dickson for The Guardian

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Andrew Dickson for The Guardian detailed the Memphis-made man and his iconographic photographs in anticipation for William Eggleston's upcoming solo exhibition William Eggleston: Portraits at the National Portrait Gallery.  The exhibition will be on view from 21 July until 23 October, 2016.

"William Eggleston is a pioneering American photographer renowned for his vivid, poetic and mysterious images. This exhibition of 100 works surveys Eggleston’s full career from the 1960s to the present day and is the most comprehensive display of his portrait photography ever."

Untitled , c1970, Devoe Money in Jackson, Mississippi. Photographs: © Eggleston Artistic Trust  

Untitled, c1970, Devoe Money in Jackson, Mississippi. Photographs: © Eggleston Artistic Trust
 

"Critics called his photographs a con when they were first shown 40 years ago, but Eggleston’s colour-saturated work has found lasting fame, defying interpretation

With impeccable timing, 40 years on, Eggleston returns with another major retrospective at another major museum, the National Portrait Gallery – a sign, perhaps, that Eggleston is now part of the establishment. Colour photography is mainstream; mobile phones and social media have made snapshots the most natural visual language of all. Once reviled, Eggleston himself is now revered, and correspondingly expensive – prints now sell for £350,000-plus.

Untitled , 1969–70, the artist’s uncle, Ayden Schuyler senior, with Jasper Staples, in Cassidy Bayou, Summer, Mississippi. Photograph: ©Eggleston Artistic Trust

Untitled, 1969–70, the artist’s uncle, Ayden Schuyler senior, with Jasper Staples, in Cassidy Bayou, Summer, Mississippi. Photograph: ©Eggleston Artistic Trust

Yet to encounter his photographs is still to revel in their strange wonder, their droll and sphinx-like resistance to interpretation. Critics falter when they try to place him: a reworker of the Duchampian readymade? A chronicler of southern gothic? Eggleston, forgivably wary of those who presume to pin down his work, prefers to let the pictures do the talking. And what they say remains peculiar enough."

Read the expansive write-up on The Guardian

William Eggleston: Portraits will be on view at The National Portrait Gallery from 21 July until 23 October, 2016.  Exhibition details npg.org.uk

Exhibition, Unseen William Eggleston Photographs of Joe Strummer and Dennis Hopper at National Portrait Gallery

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

William Eggleston, pioneer in color photography, is unveiling never before seen portraits of rockstar Joe Strummer of The Clash and Hollywood actor Dennis Hopper at the National Portrait Gallery in London.  This is the first and most comprehensive exhibition solely dedicated to Eggleston's portraiture work.  

Left: Joe Strummer, Above: Dennis Hopper by William Eggleston © Eggleston Artistic Trust

Left: Joe Strummer, Above: Dennis Hopper
by William Eggleston © Eggleston Artistic Trust

Director of NPG Nicolas Cullinan shares, "Eggleston has an uncanny ability to find something extraordinary in the seemingly everyday. Combining well-known works with others previously unseen, this exhibition looks at one of photography’s most compelling practitioners from a new perspective.”

The exhibition will display more than 100 works spanning over several decades.  The photographs include people in diners, markets, self-portraits from photobooths, and other vignettes into Eggleston's everyday encounters.

The exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery will be from 21 July until 23 October, 2016.

Read more on irishexaminer.com

Visit npg.org.uk for details.

Source: http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/eggleston/ex...