Filtering by Tag: Color Photography

Photographer William Eggleston pioneered use of colour at MOMA

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William Eggleston’s Greenwood, Mississippi (1973). Collection National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

William Eggleston’s Greenwood, Mississippi (1973). Collection National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

In May 1976, a photography exhibition opened at New York’s Museum of Modern Art that The New York Times described as the “most hated show of the year” and The Village Voice as “some sort of con”.

The principal reason for all the vitriol? The photographer, William Eggleston, had the audacity to print his images in colour.

Looking back, it may seem ludicrous there was such contempt for colour photography. However, at the time black-and-white was the prevailing aesthetic and colour photography was the realm of advertising. Furthermore, influential photographer Walker Evans had described colour as “vulgar”.

Despite the negative response, that MoMA exhibition is considered the moment when colour photography became an art form. With just one exhibition, Eggleston managed to show how the use of saturated colour could transcend its commercial origins. He suddenly made colour legitimate and he is often described as the greatest colourist in photographic history.

But colour wasn’t the critics’ only gripe. Eggleston was also lampooned for his choice of ordinary, nondescript subjects, such as a child’s tricycle, a man on a phone and a woman in curlers. He once famously remarked that “I’ve been photographing democratically” to sum up his approach. He also documented his personal life: his wife and children, but also the drug and alcohol-fuelled parties with musicians and artists, and his long-term lovers, such as Viva, one of Andy Warhol’s “superstars”. He is also renowned for taking only one photo of any subject, never a second shot.

For entire read please visit TheAustralian.

AnOtherMag Presents: Inside the Mind of Seminal Photographer William Eggleston

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William Eggleston , 2016, Photography by Chris Rhodes

William Eggleston, 2016, Photography by Chris Rhodes

The godfather of colour photography answers Jefferson Hack's take on the Proust Questionnaire. His interview is accompanied by an original portrait shot by Eggleston devotee, Chris Rhodes.

Three weeks ago, William Eggleston made a rare appearance at David Zwirner Gallery in Mayfair, London to host a book signing of the accompanying tome to his magnificent new exhibition William Eggleston: Portraits, currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery. As one might expect, the 77-year-old, Tennessee-born photographer – whose revolutionary, five-decade strong opus has inspired generations of artists including David Lynch, Nan Goldin and Jeff Wall – drew an impressively large and diverse crowd, itself indicative of his superlative influence. One such attendee was British photographer and AnOther Magazine contributor Chris Rhodes, who seized the opportunity to take Eggleston's portrait [seen above] to mark the occasion. "To me, he's the greatest living photographer. I admire his visionary use of colour, turning colour photography into an art form – the simple yet profound way of photographing the mundane while ultimately creating visual poetry," mused Rhodes, adding...

Please visit AnOther Mag for comlpte read and questionnaire with Jefferson Hack

What makes William Eggleston's ordinary photographs so extraordinary?

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Though they’re presented as portraits, the images in this National Portrait Gallery show aren’t really portraiture. They’re much more ambiguous than that

Martin Gayford


‘Untitled’, c.1971, by William Eggleston

‘Untitled’, c.1971, by William Eggleston

In 1965 William Eggleston took the first colour photograph that, he felt, really succeeded. The location was outside a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee; the time — to judge from the rich golden light and long shadows — late afternoon. Eggleston’s subject — a young man with a heavily slicked, early Elvis hairstyle stacking trolleys outside the shop — was as ordinary as he could be. But the result was a photographic masterpiece.

It is included in the exhibition William Eggleston: Portraits at the National Portrait Gallery, although, by most definitions, it is not a portrait. Indeed, it is as hard to say just what it is as it is to explain exactly why it is so good.


The catalogue essay by the curator, Phillip Prodger, recounts how the photographer was once pressed to explain a shot of his infant son lying asleep in bed (pictured above). Is this a meditation on childhood, or a commemoration of this boy at a tender age? No, Eggleston insisted, sounding a bit vexed, ‘It’s something more ambiguous than that.’

Complete read at The Spectator. 

William Eggleston: the stories that inspired David Lynch's favourite photographer

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 Untitled, c.1975 (Marcia Hare in Memphis Tennessee) by William Eggleston CREDIT: EGGLESTON ARTISTIC TRUST

 Untitled, c.1975 (Marcia Hare in Memphis Tennessee) by William Eggleston CREDIT: EGGLESTON ARTISTIC TRUST

By Lucy Davies

By his own count, William Eggleston has taken somewhere between one and two million photographs, though only ever one of each scene. “I have a personal rule: never more than one picture,” he says, “and I have never wished I had taken a picture differently. It simply happens that I was right to begin with.”

Eggleston, now 76, speaks with the courtly lilt of a man born and raised in the tattered decadence of a 12,000-acre plantation in Memphis, Tennessee. Since he began taking pictures in the Sixties, photography has been his sole occupation, which explains the size of his oeuvre, but not its quality, which has enraptured viewers in the intervening years.

For full article please visit The Telegraph

 

A Road Less Traveled: How William Eggleston Transformed Photography in America

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ARTSY EDITORIAL
BY ABIGAIL CAIN
JUL 22ND, 2016 10:35 AM

William Eggleston Untitled, 1965/2012 Gagosian Gallery

William Eggleston
Untitled, 1965/2012
Gagosian Gallery

William Eggleston Morton, Mississippi , 1969-1970  ROSEGALLERY

William Eggleston
Morton, Mississippi , 1969-1970
ROSEGALLERY

William Eggleston has no trouble pinpointing the first of his color photographs that he considers a success. It was 1965, late afternoon, and the American photographer was standing outside a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee. The warm sunlight had just caught the blonde hair and absentminded expression of a teenaged employee, who was dutifully organizing shopping carts. Eggleston aimed his camera and moved in close. Click. The resulting image embodies, in many ways, his eventual photographic practice—inconsequential moments in the American South, captured in such a manner that the colors practically glow.

Please visit Artsy for complete read. 

Memphis Made Man, William Eggleston, in detail by Andrew Dickson for The Guardian

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Andrew Dickson for The Guardian detailed the Memphis-made man and his iconographic photographs in anticipation for William Eggleston's upcoming solo exhibition William Eggleston: Portraits at the National Portrait Gallery.  The exhibition will be on view from 21 July until 23 October, 2016.

"William Eggleston is a pioneering American photographer renowned for his vivid, poetic and mysterious images. This exhibition of 100 works surveys Eggleston’s full career from the 1960s to the present day and is the most comprehensive display of his portrait photography ever."

Untitled , c1970, Devoe Money in Jackson, Mississippi. Photographs: © Eggleston Artistic Trust  

Untitled, c1970, Devoe Money in Jackson, Mississippi. Photographs: © Eggleston Artistic Trust
 

"Critics called his photographs a con when they were first shown 40 years ago, but Eggleston’s colour-saturated work has found lasting fame, defying interpretation

With impeccable timing, 40 years on, Eggleston returns with another major retrospective at another major museum, the National Portrait Gallery – a sign, perhaps, that Eggleston is now part of the establishment. Colour photography is mainstream; mobile phones and social media have made snapshots the most natural visual language of all. Once reviled, Eggleston himself is now revered, and correspondingly expensive – prints now sell for £350,000-plus.

Untitled , 1969–70, the artist’s uncle, Ayden Schuyler senior, with Jasper Staples, in Cassidy Bayou, Summer, Mississippi. Photograph: ©Eggleston Artistic Trust

Untitled, 1969–70, the artist’s uncle, Ayden Schuyler senior, with Jasper Staples, in Cassidy Bayou, Summer, Mississippi. Photograph: ©Eggleston Artistic Trust

Yet to encounter his photographs is still to revel in their strange wonder, their droll and sphinx-like resistance to interpretation. Critics falter when they try to place him: a reworker of the Duchampian readymade? A chronicler of southern gothic? Eggleston, forgivably wary of those who presume to pin down his work, prefers to let the pictures do the talking. And what they say remains peculiar enough."

Read the expansive write-up on The Guardian

William Eggleston: Portraits will be on view at The National Portrait Gallery from 21 July until 23 October, 2016.  Exhibition details npg.org.uk

John Chiara "West Side at Tioronda" at Yossi Milo Gallery

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San Francisco-based artist John Chiara is premiering new work made in New York at Yossi Milo Gallery in Manhattan's Chelsea district.  The exhibition West Side at Tioronda is on view from 14 April through 21 May with a reception for the artist on Thursday 14 April from 6 - 8 PM.

"For the first time in his career, San Francisco-based artist John Chiara is working in New York, capturing Manhattan and the Hudson River Valley with his distinctive photographic equipment and singular developing process. In approaching two areas with undeniably rich histories as subjects of photography and painting, Chiara presents the familiar in unfamiliar ways, often boldly inverting color and abstracting the image by finding unique perspectives. Drawing inspiration from early photographers such as Edward Steichen, Chiara creates similarly evocative photographs that meditate on place and speak to the environment as it is felt, rather than seen. He extends the lineage of collective memory embedded in these locations with his own sensibility and vision."

For more information on John Chiara please visit his ARTIST PAGE.

Source: http://www.yossimilo.com/exhibitions/2016_...

Artist News, 10 Photographers Who Captured the Grit and Glamor of L.A. on ARTSY

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"Known for palm trees, surfer dudes, and the film industry, Los Angeles and its history are characterized by the city’s laid-back living and Hollywood elegance. Yet L.A. has always been more than meets the eye, bursting at the seams with outsider culture and the idiosyncrasies of everyday life. Over the second half of the 20th century, the city was a muse for pioneering photographers, who both captured its beauty and laid bare its gritty realities."

Photographers include Elliot Erwitt, Robert Frank, Bob Willoughby, Julius Shulman, Garry Winogrand, Lee Friedlander, William EgglestonBruce Davidson, Mary Ellen Mark, and Catherine Opie.

WILLIAM EGGLESTON:

Left: William Eggleston, Untitled (Car Wreck) [From The Seventies: Volume two] (Circa 1970) Right: William Eggleston, Untitled (Topiary Trees, Hollywood) (1999 - 2000)   

Left: William Eggleston, Untitled (Car Wreck) [From The Seventies: Volume two] (Circa 1970)
Right: William Eggleston, Untitled (Topiary Trees, Hollywood) (1999 - 2000)

 

Finding suitable subjects in a cupboard of foodstuffs, an abandoned bicycle, and anonymous people on city sidewalks, William Eggleston and his intensely hued dye-transfer prints unequivocally thrust the mundane, as well as spectacles, into the spotlight, all while he led the charge into non-commercial color photography.

BRUCE DAVIDSON:

Bruce Davidson,  Surfers along Pacific Coast, Los Angeles, California , 1964

Bruce Davidson, Surfers along Pacific Coast, Los Angeles, California, 1964

Davidson has consistently brought this sensitivity and novel perspective to subjects ranging from gang members in Brooklyn to the Civil Rights struggle in the South. His images of L.A.—from a carefree surfer youth to the lonesome back of the Hollywood sign—exude this intimate attention.

Read about the excursions across and around L.A. by the several photographers highlighted on artsy.net