Filtering by Category: Exhibitions

Elger Esser Exhibition AETAS - Landesgalerie Linz, Austria

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On view at the Landesgalerie Linz in Austria is Elger Esser's Landscape work.  The exhibition will be on display until 23 April, 2017.

Elger Esser, Harmas (Iris III), 2014

Elger Esser, Harmas (Iris III), 2014

The Landesgalerie Linz will present the first single museum exhibition of the photographic work of Elger Esser in Austria in 2017. The central theme of his extensive work - the landscape - is the focus of the show. Through his classical compositions and the use of historical phototechnics, the graduate of the Fotoklasse by Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Düsseldorf Academy of Fine Arts is included in the tradition of baroque landscape painting and historical photography of the late 19th century.

More information HERE.

This Upcoming Exhibition Highlights the Work of 116 Radical Latina & Latin American Artists

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Graciela Itrubide, Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico, 1979

Graciela Itrubide, Nuestra Señora de las Iguanas, Juchitán, Mexico, 1979

“Because the system’s so biased and so restrictive, so much wonderful art has [gone] completely unnoticed.” With these words, Cecilia Fajardo-Hill succinctly described the impetus for an upcoming exhibition – Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985 – at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. The last few decades has seen progress for female artists, but the art world hasn’t reached parity, with men still basking in the limelight far more often than women.

As LA Weekly notes, the Guggenheim dedicated 86 percent of solo shows to men in 2014. And between 2007 to 2014, the Tate Modern in London only featured female artists’ works in solo exhibitions a quarter of the time. Radical Women – which Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta curated together – exclusively focuses on Latinas and Latin American women who US museums don’t typically feature. “The reason for this is not a question of talent, but of a patriarchal matrix placed on the history of Latin American and Latina art,” Fajardo-Hill tells LA Weekly. “In other words, the system was even more biased than we knew it to be.”

In 2010, When they began looking into this topic, the curators found themselves having to defend the need for an exhibit that closely looks at Latin American and Latina art. Detractors told them that only a select number of women were worth highlight. But they refused to buy into this misguided notion, finding instead, that these women’s stories are necessary to tell.

“We are looking at a lot of women that have been completely overlooked,” Fajardo-Hill told the Los Angeles Times. “These are women that have shaped how we understand contemporary art today, how we use our bodies, how we can think about our bodies at a conceptual level.”

For complete details, please visit, remezcla.

ROSEGALLERY Exhibition "He/She/They" named top 10 LA art shows - Hyperallergic

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Best of 2016: Our Top 10 Los Angeles Art Shows
These top 10 shows in no way capture a full overview of the art seen in LA this year, but they provide highlights of the rapidly developing artistic landscape of the city.

Yasumasa Morimura, Portrait of Marilyn, 1995

Yasumasa Morimura, Portrait of Marilyn, 1995

9: He/She/They at ROSEGALLERY

In 2015, “they” was nominated word of the year by the American Dialect Society, an indication, at least on the level of language, that American culture is making some moves away from the gender binary. The exhibition He/She/They took that shift to heart, organizing works dating from the early 1930s to the present from around the globe, with a focus on portraiture in the ever-changing medium of photography. The works either directly discussed the constructs of gender or dismantled them altogether. Katsumi Watanabe’s late ’60s portraits captured candid shots of people from Tokyo’s queer nightlife. Susan Meiselas documented carnival strippers during the early ’70s, at the same time the feminist movement was taking shape in the US. In his series Orchard Beach: The Bronx Riviera, Wayne Lawrence documented beachgoers at the Bronx’s only public beach. He/She/They brought a much-needed, refreshing look at gender. —Alicia Eler

Read the full top 10 list of Los Angeles Exhibitions on hyperallergic.com

Bruce Davidson: Survey on L'Oeil de la Photography

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"The common thread in Davidson’s career is undoubtedly his way of working over long stretches of time, of building relationships, and forging intimacy with his subjects."

The Selma March, Alabama, 1965

The Selma March, Alabama, 1965

Jimmy Armstrong, Palisades, New Jersey, 1958

Jimmy Armstrong, Palisades, New Jersey, 1958

Bruce Davidson's first retrospective exhibition in spain is on view at Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid until 2018.  The newest publication, Bruce Davidson: Survey, in collaboration with Aperture and the museum, is for purchase HERE

Read the full review on loeildelaphotography.com

Exhibition "We" featured in BlouinArtInfo

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Our current exhibition We was featured in BlouinArtInfo by Isabella Mason on 9 Dec.

Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from East 100th St, 1966. 

Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from East 100th St, 1966. 

Diane Arbus, Patriotic Young Man with a Flag. NYC, 1967.

Diane Arbus, Patriotic Young Man with a Flag. NYC, 1967.

"The exhibition presents a selection of photographs, paintings and prints that represent the encompassing sense of idiosyncrasies and connections in American society, underscoring the photography’s unique power in democracy, serving as the visual document of realities within. Continuing from the gallery’s previous show ‘He, She, They’, which explored through the multifaceted ways gender, sexuality, and identities are built in a society, this exhibition emphasizes on the diversity and differences in American demography, through the aspects of race, geography, and economy. Through photographs by artists like Dorothea Lange, Charles Brittin, Diane Arbus and others, the exhibition demonstrates the way people share their spaces before reconfiguring them, and through collected involvement in one place, ‘We’ collectively identify ourselves through a spatial unity."

Read on blouinartinfo.com

8 Photographers That Know Gender And Identity Are A Drag - HE/SHE/THEY on Huffington Post

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Priscilla Frank reviewed the group exhibition HE/SHE/THEY for the Huffington Post, highlighting 8 photographer's work. Here's a selection of the review:

"Drag, in case you didn’t know, is the tradition of dressing up in and often exaggerating qualities of a certain gender for the sake of performance. 

However, as Judith Butler made plain in her 1990 text Gender Trouble, “There is no original or primary gender a drag imitates, but gender is a kind of imitation for which there is no original.” Although drag is often regarded as a form of impersonation, Butler asserts that there is no manifestation of gender that isn’t already constructed, choreographed or performed in some way. What is traditional femininity if not curls and heels and soft gestures? What is masculinity if not imposing posture, stern expressions and a heavy dose of pride?

Long before theories like Butler’s made their way into college curriculums and mainstream culture, they were played out before the camera. The exhibition “He/She/They” at Los Angeles’ ROSEGALLERY explores how photographers have demonstrated the way both gender and identity only exist when performed. The artists on view posit there is no natural way to be a woman or a man, just as there is no natural way to be oneself.

The show features a variety of artists who live and work everywhere from Mexico City to Osaka, Japan, each using the camera to document the always already artificial nature of the self.

Some photographers capture their subjects as strictly masculine or feminine, adhering to the codes that establish them as such. Others operate in the space between, depicting people who are androgynous or genderqueer. And many enjoy playing with conventions, turning them upside down while switching genders or ethnicities as easily as one switches an outfit. 

The following eight photographers are a diverse bunch. Some lay bare the norms and practices we associate with gender, while others work to overturn them. But all, in some way, realize that subjects don’t just perform for the camera, they perform in the self-portraits that constitute their lives. "

Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, Juchitan, Oaxaca, 1986

Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, Juchitan, Oaxaca, 1986

Lise Sarfati, Malaika, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010

Lise Sarfati, Malaika, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010

Nikki S. Lee, The Hip Hop Project (1), 2001

Nikki S. Lee, The Hip Hop Project (1), 2001

Read the full review with images on huffingtonpost.com
Visit the HE/SHE/THEY EXHIBITION PAGE for more artist and exhibition info.

Alicia Eler reviews HE/SHE/THEY for Aperture

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Alicia Eler writes, "Spanning over eighty years of photographs, an exhibition explores the gender non-conforming potential of the word 'they.'

Yasumasa Morimura, Jane Fonda 5 (Barbarella), 1995  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

Lise Sarfati, Malaïka #7, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

The singular gender-neutral pronoun “they” was named word of the year in 2016. Judging from the social and historical depth of photography and archival imagery in the exhibition He/She/They, currently on view at ROSEGALLERY, which includes work by more than fifteen artists, it’s crazy to think that it took this long to get American culture at large to recognize life outside the gender binary. Ranging from the early 1930s to the present, the works exhibit a wide array of bodies, locations, gazes, and socioeconomic perspectives, and consider the intersectional influence of race and class on notions of gender.

Since this exhibition is presented in Los Angeles, Lise Sarfati’s Malaïka #7, Corner 7th Street and Spring from the series On Hollywood (2010), is appropriately local and captures a woman trying to make it in the entertainment industry. In this startling photograph, a young woman appears forlorn, perhaps returning from an audition, unsure of what to do next. The actress’s face, and the low-angle perspective, is reminiscent of Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Still #21 (1978), in which a young woman, who could be any (white) woman, looks intently beyond the frame, with an imposing block of skyscrapers forming the background. Marrying visual art and Hollywood icons, her dress and hairstyle reference Marilyn Monroe and the “dumb blonde” archetype.

Graciela Iturbide, Carnaval, Tlaxcala, Mexico, 1974  © the artist and courtesy ROSEGALLERY

...Other works in the show focus less on the performance of gender, and more on people who defy normative gender distinctions. Nineteenth-century photographs depict Native American “two-spirit” individuals—those who participate in gender roles not assigned to their sex—but the accompanying text explains that intersex, androgynous, and gender non-conforming people could be held in high regard outside of Eurocentric, heteronormative cultures. In photographs by Mexican artist Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, who identified as Muxe (Zapotec for homosexual and “genderqueer”), poses for the camera wearing a dress and sombrero, a traditionally male accessory.

He/She/They leans heavily on the visual language of portraiture, which might suggest a desire for authenticity in documentation, in contrast to much of the dynamic content found online, where self-expression by social media sensations, celebrities, and everyday people appears to be constantly evolving. The photographs in this show offer a fixed moment in time, declarative and definitive, but also remain open to the many shades of identity, the gender non-conforming potential of the word “they.”

Alicia Eler is a journalist based in Los Angeles. A contributor to New York Magazine, The Guardian,VICE, LA Weekly, Hyperallergic, Art21, and Artforum, she is currently working on her first book,The Selfie Generation (Skyhorse).

He/She/They is on view at ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica, through November 12, 2016."

Read the full review on aperture.org/blog!

Tomoko Sawada, Rinko Kawauchi in "Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now" at SFMOMA

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Tomoko Sawada, Rinko Kawauchi, as well as Yasumasa Morimura, Leiko Shiga and Ishiuchi Miyako will be on view in Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at the SFMOMA this fall.  
15 October, 2016 - 12 March, 2017, Floor 3

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series the eyes, the ears, 2005

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series the eyes, the ears, 2005

Lieko Shiga, Tomlinson FC, from the series Lilly, 2005

Lieko Shiga, Tomlinson FC, from the series Lilly, 2005

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now includes photographs from the 1960s, when major figures such as Shomei Tomatsu and Daido Moriyama investigated Americanization and industrial growth; the more personal and performative work of Nobuyoshi Araki and Eikoh Hosoe; and photography addressing the present culture and the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Organized thematically, the show explores topics such as Japan’s relationship with America, changes in the city and countryside, and the emergence of women, especially Miyako Ishiuchi, Rinko Kawauchi, and Lieko Shiga, as significant contributors to contemporary Japanese photography.

Read more on SFMOMA.org