Bruce Davidson: Survey on L'Oeil de la Photography

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

"The common thread in Davidson’s career is undoubtedly his way of working over long stretches of time, of building relationships, and forging intimacy with his subjects."

The Selma March, Alabama, 1965

The Selma March, Alabama, 1965

Jimmy Armstrong, Palisades, New Jersey, 1958

Jimmy Armstrong, Palisades, New Jersey, 1958

Bruce Davidson's first retrospective exhibition in spain is on view at Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid until 2018.  The newest publication, Bruce Davidson: Survey, in collaboration with Aperture and the museum, is for purchase HERE

Read the full review on loeildelaphotography.com

Exhibition "We" featured in BlouinArtInfo

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Our current exhibition We was featured in BlouinArtInfo by Isabella Mason on 9 Dec.

Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from East 100th St, 1966. 

Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from East 100th St, 1966. 

Diane Arbus, Patriotic Young Man with a Flag. NYC, 1967.

Diane Arbus, Patriotic Young Man with a Flag. NYC, 1967.

"The exhibition presents a selection of photographs, paintings and prints that represent the encompassing sense of idiosyncrasies and connections in American society, underscoring the photography’s unique power in democracy, serving as the visual document of realities within. Continuing from the gallery’s previous show ‘He, She, They’, which explored through the multifaceted ways gender, sexuality, and identities are built in a society, this exhibition emphasizes on the diversity and differences in American demography, through the aspects of race, geography, and economy. Through photographs by artists like Dorothea Lange, Charles Brittin, Diane Arbus and others, the exhibition demonstrates the way people share their spaces before reconfiguring them, and through collected involvement in one place, ‘We’ collectively identify ourselves through a spatial unity."

Read on blouinartinfo.com

Video Interview with Japanese Photographers - Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

Explore a series of Video Interviews with artists Nobuyoshi Araki, Daido Moriyama, Rinko Kawauchi, Tomoko Sawada, Ishiuchi Miyako, Asako Narahashi and others in light of the exhibition "Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now" on SFMOMA online here:

Nobuyoshi Araki

Nobuyoshi Araki

Tomoko Sawada

Tomoko Sawada

Asako Narahashi

Asako Narahashi

Nobuyoshi Araki

Nobuyoshi Araki

Daido Moriyama

Daido Moriyama

Ichiuchi Miyako

Ichiuchi Miyako

Rinko Kawauchi

Rinko Kawauchi

Daido Moriyama

Daido Moriyama

Ichiuchi Miyako

Ichiuchi Miyako

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now is on view at SFMOMA until March 12, 2017.

For more information please visit the artists' ROSEGALLERY profiles:
Rinko Kawauchi, Daido MoriyamaTomoko Sawada, Asako Narahashi

William Eggleston's The Democratic Forest: The Godfather of Color Photography is a Poet

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.
William Eggleston, portrait by Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston, portrait by Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest

By:Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston’s photographs didn’t immediately have an impact on me. When I started taking pictures regularly, making artwork and studying photography, I initially found myself captivated by fine art photographers like Larry Clark, Nan Goldin, Richard Kern, Nick Knight’s Skinhead book, and later Ryan McGinley, Wolfgang Tillmans and Dash Snow. These photographers offered me a visual portal into worlds that I was either curious about or desperately wanted to be a part of. Images of glamorous downtown artists, drug abuse, delinquent behavior and moments of anguish accented by expressions of ecstatic joy. These photographers’ work gave me a glimpse of a life that I wanted to live, and also provided me hope that with a camera (and a laptop) I could find my entry into their worlds, or at least my own version of their worlds. Eggleston’s work, on the other hand, isn’t as immediately provocative. His focus has always been on iconography of the mundane: street signs, middle American shops, and ceiling fans have always been his language. 

Visit Forbes for complete read. 

Artist News: Dirk Braeckman to represent Belgium at the 57th Venice Biennale

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.
"My photos are like unexploded bombs, charged and full of pent-up energy"
-Dirk Braeckman
Dirk Braeckman, 27.1 / 21.7 / 045 / 2014, 2014. Courtesy of Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp.

Dirk Braeckman, 27.1 / 21.7 / 045 / 2014, 2014. Courtesy of Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp.

Dirk Braeckman: “Participating in the Venice Biennale feels like a victory for Belgian photography, which has never had a broad international platform within the visual arts. Nowadays, everyone is capable of taking good photographs and people are only really interested in the end results. I oppose this trend by emphasizing a process-centered exploration. My photos are like unexploded bombs, charged and full of pent-up energy.”

Dirk Braeckman will represent Belgium at the 57th Venice Biennale. His exhibition in the Belgian pavilion at Giardini will be curated by Eva Wittocx, with M - Museum Leuven as the organizing institution. After past editions featuring artists like Vincent Meessen, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Angel Vergara, Jef Geys, Éric Duyckaerts and Honoré d’O, Flemish Minister for Culture Sven Gatz has decided that Dirk Braeckman will now occupy the international stage in Venice.

In his enigmatic photographs, Dirk Braeckman creates a closed, isolated world in which tactility and texture, distance and intimacy are combined. His monumental photographs tell us nothing, yet they suggest entire stories. Braeckman reflects on the photographic image and challenges the medium’s illusions. He experiments in his creative process with different textures and materials, and explores effects such as over and under-exposure through a variety of printing techniques. Braeckman’s images transcend the moment of capture and reach beyond their frame. He finds the subjects for his photographic work in his immediate vicinity—often undefined places or spaces, preferably interior views.

Dirk Braeckman will create a new set of monumental photographs for the Biennale, tailoring their presentation to the architecture of the Belgian Pavilion. His selection of intriguing pictures will respond to the mass production and consumption of images. Pictures and slogans constantly demand our attention nowadays, whether on television, the internet or in the public space. Dirk Braeckman and curator Eva Wittocx will endeavor to create a sense of tranquillity in the Belgian pavilion, allowing visitors to focus their full attention on the images.

The new body of works that Braeckman is making for Venice will be presented in early 2018 at a double show at BOZAR in Brussels and M - Museum in Leuven.


Please visit e-flux for complete read. 

Manuel Álvarez Bravo: Mexico, Light and Time in Silence at Nagoya City Art Museum, Japan

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

To introduce the charm of the work of Manuel Álvarez Bravo spanning about 70 years, 192 black and white prints and documents will be on view.  This is Japan's largest full-scale retrospective of his work.  

Manuel Álvarez Bravo, La hija de los danzantes [The Daughter of the Dancers], Mexico, 1933

Manuel Álvarez Bravo, La hija de los danzantes [The Daughter of the Dancers], Mexico, 1933

Manuel Alvarez Bravo (1902-2002) is one of the key figures in the history of Latin-American photography. He first garnered attention in the late 1920s after the Mexican Revolution, a turbulent time that saw the rise of avant-garde art and the muralism movement, both of which influenced his surrealist but poetic images. Up until the ’90s, he produced a steady flow of timeless photographs that exude an artful sense of tranquility. 
-Mark Jarnes for The Japan Times
 

Visit art-museum.city.nagoya.jp for full exhibition details.

HE/SHE/THEY Reviewed in Blouin Artinfo

Added on by ROSEGALLERY.

ROSEGALLERY is showcasing a group exhibition titled “HE / SHE / THEY” by some renowned photographers that will be on view through November 30, 2016.

Susan Meiselas, Mitzi, Tunbridge, VT, 1974

Susan Meiselas, Mitzi, Tunbridge, VT, 1974

This exhibition is a culmination of the work of various photographers who utilize their own and others’ image to find what lies beyond the constructs of prescribed gender and sexual identity. With works by Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Diane Arbus, Nancy Burson, Andrew Bush, Antonio Caballero, Jo Ann Callis, Graciela Iturbide, Wayne Lawrence, Jocelyn Lee, Nikki S. Lee, Susan Meiselas, Yasumasa Morimura, Lise Sarfati, Tomoko Sawada and Katsumi Watanabe, the exhibition is showcasing how the modern society stills stereotypes the gender orientation. With subjects that challenge the creation of identities based on gender and idealized norms, the artists’ works reflect the bourgeoning independence from the prescribed norms of gender and sexuality.

The exhibition is showcased at 2525 Michigan Ave G5, Santa Monica, CA 90404, USA.

See a full slideshow on blouinartinfo.com