Video Interview with Japanese Photographers - Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at SFMOMA

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Explore a series of Video Interviews with artists Nobuyoshi Araki, Daido Moriyama, Rinko Kawauchi, Tomoko Sawada, Ishiuchi Miyako, Asako Narahashi and others in light of the exhibition "Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now" on SFMOMA online here:

Nobuyoshi Araki

Nobuyoshi Araki

Tomoko Sawada

Tomoko Sawada

Asako Narahashi

Asako Narahashi

Nobuyoshi Araki

Nobuyoshi Araki

Daido Moriyama

Daido Moriyama

Ichiuchi Miyako

Ichiuchi Miyako

Rinko Kawauchi

Rinko Kawauchi

Daido Moriyama

Daido Moriyama

Ichiuchi Miyako

Ichiuchi Miyako

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now is on view at SFMOMA until March 12, 2017.

For more information please visit the artists' ROSEGALLERY profiles:
Rinko Kawauchi, Daido MoriyamaTomoko Sawada, Asako Narahashi

William Eggleston's The Democratic Forest: The Godfather of Color Photography is a Poet

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William Eggleston, portrait by Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston, portrait by Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest

By:Adam Lehrer

William Eggleston’s photographs didn’t immediately have an impact on me. When I started taking pictures regularly, making artwork and studying photography, I initially found myself captivated by fine art photographers like Larry Clark, Nan Goldin, Richard Kern, Nick Knight’s Skinhead book, and later Ryan McGinley, Wolfgang Tillmans and Dash Snow. These photographers offered me a visual portal into worlds that I was either curious about or desperately wanted to be a part of. Images of glamorous downtown artists, drug abuse, delinquent behavior and moments of anguish accented by expressions of ecstatic joy. These photographers’ work gave me a glimpse of a life that I wanted to live, and also provided me hope that with a camera (and a laptop) I could find my entry into their worlds, or at least my own version of their worlds. Eggleston’s work, on the other hand, isn’t as immediately provocative. His focus has always been on iconography of the mundane: street signs, middle American shops, and ceiling fans have always been his language. 

Visit Forbes for complete read. 

Artist News: Dirk Braeckman to represent Belgium at the 57th Venice Biennale

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"My photos are like unexploded bombs, charged and full of pent-up energy"
-Dirk Braeckman
Dirk Braeckman, 27.1 / 21.7 / 045 / 2014, 2014. Courtesy of Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp.

Dirk Braeckman, 27.1 / 21.7 / 045 / 2014, 2014. Courtesy of Zeno X Gallery, Antwerp.

Dirk Braeckman: “Participating in the Venice Biennale feels like a victory for Belgian photography, which has never had a broad international platform within the visual arts. Nowadays, everyone is capable of taking good photographs and people are only really interested in the end results. I oppose this trend by emphasizing a process-centered exploration. My photos are like unexploded bombs, charged and full of pent-up energy.”

Dirk Braeckman will represent Belgium at the 57th Venice Biennale. His exhibition in the Belgian pavilion at Giardini will be curated by Eva Wittocx, with M - Museum Leuven as the organizing institution. After past editions featuring artists like Vincent Meessen, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Angel Vergara, Jef Geys, Éric Duyckaerts and Honoré d’O, Flemish Minister for Culture Sven Gatz has decided that Dirk Braeckman will now occupy the international stage in Venice.

In his enigmatic photographs, Dirk Braeckman creates a closed, isolated world in which tactility and texture, distance and intimacy are combined. His monumental photographs tell us nothing, yet they suggest entire stories. Braeckman reflects on the photographic image and challenges the medium’s illusions. He experiments in his creative process with different textures and materials, and explores effects such as over and under-exposure through a variety of printing techniques. Braeckman’s images transcend the moment of capture and reach beyond their frame. He finds the subjects for his photographic work in his immediate vicinity—often undefined places or spaces, preferably interior views.

Dirk Braeckman will create a new set of monumental photographs for the Biennale, tailoring their presentation to the architecture of the Belgian Pavilion. His selection of intriguing pictures will respond to the mass production and consumption of images. Pictures and slogans constantly demand our attention nowadays, whether on television, the internet or in the public space. Dirk Braeckman and curator Eva Wittocx will endeavor to create a sense of tranquillity in the Belgian pavilion, allowing visitors to focus their full attention on the images.

The new body of works that Braeckman is making for Venice will be presented in early 2018 at a double show at BOZAR in Brussels and M - Museum in Leuven.


Please visit e-flux for complete read. 

Manuel Álvarez Bravo: Mexico, Light and Time in Silence at Nagoya City Art Museum, Japan

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To introduce the charm of the work of Manuel Álvarez Bravo spanning about 70 years, 192 black and white prints and documents will be on view.  This is Japan's largest full-scale retrospective of his work.  

Manuel Álvarez Bravo, La hija de los danzantes [The Daughter of the Dancers], Mexico, 1933

Manuel Álvarez Bravo, La hija de los danzantes [The Daughter of the Dancers], Mexico, 1933

Manuel Alvarez Bravo (1902-2002) is one of the key figures in the history of Latin-American photography. He first garnered attention in the late 1920s after the Mexican Revolution, a turbulent time that saw the rise of avant-garde art and the muralism movement, both of which influenced his surrealist but poetic images. Up until the ’90s, he produced a steady flow of timeless photographs that exude an artful sense of tranquility. 
-Mark Jarnes for The Japan Times
 

Visit art-museum.city.nagoya.jp for full exhibition details.

HE/SHE/THEY Reviewed in Blouin Artinfo

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ROSEGALLERY is showcasing a group exhibition titled “HE / SHE / THEY” by some renowned photographers that will be on view through November 30, 2016.

Susan Meiselas, Mitzi, Tunbridge, VT, 1974

Susan Meiselas, Mitzi, Tunbridge, VT, 1974

This exhibition is a culmination of the work of various photographers who utilize their own and others’ image to find what lies beyond the constructs of prescribed gender and sexual identity. With works by Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Diane Arbus, Nancy Burson, Andrew Bush, Antonio Caballero, Jo Ann Callis, Graciela Iturbide, Wayne Lawrence, Jocelyn Lee, Nikki S. Lee, Susan Meiselas, Yasumasa Morimura, Lise Sarfati, Tomoko Sawada and Katsumi Watanabe, the exhibition is showcasing how the modern society stills stereotypes the gender orientation. With subjects that challenge the creation of identities based on gender and idealized norms, the artists’ works reflect the bourgeoning independence from the prescribed norms of gender and sexuality.

The exhibition is showcased at 2525 Michigan Ave G5, Santa Monica, CA 90404, USA.

See a full slideshow on blouinartinfo.com

8 Photographers That Know Gender And Identity Are A Drag - HE/SHE/THEY on Huffington Post

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Priscilla Frank reviewed the group exhibition HE/SHE/THEY for the Huffington Post, highlighting 8 photographer's work. Here's a selection of the review:

"Drag, in case you didn’t know, is the tradition of dressing up in and often exaggerating qualities of a certain gender for the sake of performance. 

However, as Judith Butler made plain in her 1990 text Gender Trouble, “There is no original or primary gender a drag imitates, but gender is a kind of imitation for which there is no original.” Although drag is often regarded as a form of impersonation, Butler asserts that there is no manifestation of gender that isn’t already constructed, choreographed or performed in some way. What is traditional femininity if not curls and heels and soft gestures? What is masculinity if not imposing posture, stern expressions and a heavy dose of pride?

Long before theories like Butler’s made their way into college curriculums and mainstream culture, they were played out before the camera. The exhibition “He/She/They” at Los Angeles’ ROSEGALLERY explores how photographers have demonstrated the way both gender and identity only exist when performed. The artists on view posit there is no natural way to be a woman or a man, just as there is no natural way to be oneself.

The show features a variety of artists who live and work everywhere from Mexico City to Osaka, Japan, each using the camera to document the always already artificial nature of the self.

Some photographers capture their subjects as strictly masculine or feminine, adhering to the codes that establish them as such. Others operate in the space between, depicting people who are androgynous or genderqueer. And many enjoy playing with conventions, turning them upside down while switching genders or ethnicities as easily as one switches an outfit. 

The following eight photographers are a diverse bunch. Some lay bare the norms and practices we associate with gender, while others work to overturn them. But all, in some way, realize that subjects don’t just perform for the camera, they perform in the self-portraits that constitute their lives. "

Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, Juchitan, Oaxaca, 1986

Graciela Iturbide, Magnolia, Juchitan, Oaxaca, 1986

Lise Sarfati, Malaika, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010

Lise Sarfati, Malaika, Corner 7th Street and Spring, from the series On Hollywood, 2010

Nikki S. Lee, The Hip Hop Project (1), 2001

Nikki S. Lee, The Hip Hop Project (1), 2001

Read the full review with images on huffingtonpost.com
Visit the HE/SHE/THEY EXHIBITION PAGE for more artist and exhibition info.

An Afternoon with William Eggleston - W Magazine

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An Afternoon with William Eggleston, living icon - W MAGAZINE
A visit with the 77-year old American photographer, whose democratic vision remains surprising and relevant in 2016
By Alexandra Pechman, photos by Eric Chakeen on 26 October 2016

Photo by Eric Chakeen

Photo by Eric Chakeen

From being honored at Aperture Foundation's Annual Fall Benefit, an exhibition at David Zwirner NYC, a cover story for New York Times Style Magazine, to an interview for W Magazine, the art world cannot get enough of William Eggleston.  A re-edition of The Democratic Forest accompanies the new selection of works on exhibit at Zwirner and almost every major publication is reviewing and interviewing the artist.  The resurgence of popularity is certainly well documented.  Here are our favorite sections in Eggleston's W Magazine interview below:


As ever, he cut a deliberately dapper figure, dressed for our interview in a crisp white shirt, a patterned ascot tie, and black oxford shoes with a neatly tied bow. “I think one should look great,” he said by way of explanation. He balanced an American Spirit between his ring and middle fingers — he is hardly ever not smoking — and held a Leica m3 that he noted had once belonged to Lee Friedlander. Eggleston still photographs nearly every day. Though his pictures have no particular geographic center of gravity, his own personal mythology still owes much to his time in New York in the 70's, when he showed the first all-color photography exhibition at MoMA, lived at the Chelsea Hotel, and hung out with the likes of Viva, Patti Smith, and Lou Reed.

The Democratic Forest is a series Eggleston shot across America from 1983 to 1986, and which was originally published in 1989 with a selection of 150 images from thousands of photographs. Last year, Steidl published a 10-volume box set of about 150 pages each — that's nearly 1,500 images total. And now David Zwirner Books has published a further selection from "The Democratic Forest," to accompany the gallery's show. It helps explain Eggleston’s oft-cited refrain that he doesn’t care about anyone’s pictures except his own.

“That’s the truth,” he declared. “There are plenty of other fine people out there. But I spend most of my time looking at my own things. There’s so many to look at. It takes up a lot of time.”

Eggleston has never been one to to read about photography, however, noting that most critics “talk to hear themselves talk.” He prefers to read technical books about quantum physics. “People I feel I’m closest to would be Stephen Hawking and my deceased friend Carl Sagan. I wasn’t born at the right time to know Mr. Einstein,” he said, with a wry smile. “I think we’re doing the same thing, strange as that sounds. After all the study, images, … [physics] sums up very simply, like [photography], probability. Not to be confused with possibility or what can be accurately predicted. It’s just something that probably will happen.”

Read the full article with photographs on wmagazine.com
View more WILLIAM EGGLESTON

Source: http://www.wmagazine.com/story/an-afternoo...