Tomoko Sawada, Rinko Kawauchi in "Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now" at SFMOMA

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Tomoko Sawada, Rinko Kawauchi, as well as Yasumasa Morimura, Leiko Shiga and Ishiuchi Miyako will be on view in Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now at the SFMOMA this fall.  
15 October, 2016 - 12 March, 2017, Floor 3

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series the eyes, the ears, 2005

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series the eyes, the ears, 2005

Lieko Shiga, Tomlinson FC, from the series Lilly, 2005

Lieko Shiga, Tomlinson FC, from the series Lilly, 2005

Japanese Photography from Postwar to Now includes photographs from the 1960s, when major figures such as Shomei Tomatsu and Daido Moriyama investigated Americanization and industrial growth; the more personal and performative work of Nobuyoshi Araki and Eikoh Hosoe; and photography addressing the present culture and the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Organized thematically, the show explores topics such as Japan’s relationship with America, changes in the city and countryside, and the emergence of women, especially Miyako Ishiuchi, Rinko Kawauchi, and Lieko Shiga, as significant contributors to contemporary Japanese photography.

Read more on SFMOMA.org

William Eggleston on view at the Telfair Museum and Nasher Museum at Duke University

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Watershed: Contemporary Landscape Photography
On view at the Telfair Museum, Savannah, GA
14 October, 2016 - 29 January, 2017

Watershed explores the increasingly fraught relationship between humankind and the environment, giving photographic aid to a concern that has reached global significance in recent years. Since the 1970s, landscape photographers have embraced this new relationship with the natural world, marking a firm split from the pristine worldview touted by midcentury landscape photographers like Ansel Adams. Displaying works that evidence the undeniable human impact on the earth, these photographers reveal the landscape as an activated space—one that is imprinted by mankind and marked by social performance.

telfair.org/watershed

Untitled, from Election Eve, 1976

Untitled, from Election Eve, 1976


Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art
On view at the Nasher Museum at Duke University, Durham, NC
1 September, 2016 - 8 January, 2017

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art questions and explores the complex and contested space of the American South. One needs to look no further than literature, cuisine and music to see evidence of the South’s profound influence on American culture, and consequently much of the world. This unprecedented exhibition addresses and complicates the many realities, fantasies and myths that have long captured the public’s imagination about the American South. Presenting a wide range of perspectives, from both within and outside of the region, the exhibition creates a composite portrait of southern identity through the work of 60 artists. The art reflects upon and pulls apart the dynamic nature of the South’s social, political and cultural landscape.

nasher.duke.edu/southern/

Untitled, Jackson, Mississippi, c. 1969

Untitled, Jackson, Mississippi, c. 1969

Iconic Mexican Photographer Graciela Iturbide Comes to Light in 'A Lens to See'

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Graciela Iturbide’s Autorretrato con los indios Seris, 1979

Graciela Iturbide’s Autorretrato con los indios Seris, 1979

As part of this year’s Fotoseptiembre, Ruiz-Healy Art will present “A Lens to See,” a solo exhibition of photography by Graciela Iturbide. 
The selections, gathered from the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University, one of the largest archives of contemporary Mexican photography, mark the first time Iturbide has been exhibited in a commercial gallery in Texas, and span a period from the early 1970s to 2006. Among the work are some of Iturbide’s most iconic photographs, including Our Lady of the Iguanas and Angel Woman in the Desert of Sonora, both of which depict the strength and dignity of indigenous women.

Please visit Sacurrent for full text. 

Photographer William Eggleston pioneered use of colour at MOMA

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William Eggleston’s Greenwood, Mississippi (1973). Collection National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

William Eggleston’s Greenwood, Mississippi (1973). Collection National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

In May 1976, a photography exhibition opened at New York’s Museum of Modern Art that The New York Times described as the “most hated show of the year” and The Village Voice as “some sort of con”.

The principal reason for all the vitriol? The photographer, William Eggleston, had the audacity to print his images in colour.

Looking back, it may seem ludicrous there was such contempt for colour photography. However, at the time black-and-white was the prevailing aesthetic and colour photography was the realm of advertising. Furthermore, influential photographer Walker Evans had described colour as “vulgar”.

Despite the negative response, that MoMA exhibition is considered the moment when colour photography became an art form. With just one exhibition, Eggleston managed to show how the use of saturated colour could transcend its commercial origins. He suddenly made colour legitimate and he is often described as the greatest colourist in photographic history.

But colour wasn’t the critics’ only gripe. Eggleston was also lampooned for his choice of ordinary, nondescript subjects, such as a child’s tricycle, a man on a phone and a woman in curlers. He once famously remarked that “I’ve been photographing democratically” to sum up his approach. He also documented his personal life: his wife and children, but also the drug and alcohol-fuelled parties with musicians and artists, and his long-term lovers, such as Viva, one of Andy Warhol’s “superstars”. He is also renowned for taking only one photo of any subject, never a second shot.

For entire read please visit TheAustralian.

Ruiz-Healy Art to Welcome Acclaimed Mexican Photographer Graciela Iturbide

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Four young “cholas” looking tough in East Los Angeles. A fearless woman in Juchitán, Mexico wearing several live iguanas on her head. An indigenous woman forging her way through the Sonora Desert with her long hair flowing behind her and a boom box in hand.

These are all powerful images captured by Graciela Iturbide, one of the most acclaimed photographers in the world and one of the most prolific Mexican photographers alive today. The Mexico City-native, who studied filmmaking at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and worked with the likes of Manuel Álvarez-Bravo, has made a career photographing a range of still-life scenes and human subjects, oftentimes marginalized women. Her portfolio has gained international recognition, including the Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography in 2008.

From Thursday, Sept. 8 to Saturday, Oct. 15, the Ruiz-Healy Art gallery will feature Graciela Iturbide: A Lens to See, a solo exhibition of Iturbide’s work. The show is in conjunction with FOTOSEPTIEMBRE USA International Photography Festival and features works from the Wittliff Collection at Texas State University.

The Rivard Report asked Iturbide a few questions in Spanish via email ahead of her exhibition about life as a photographer, feminism, and exploring different cultures from behind the lens. See her translated responses below.
 

RR: HOW HAS THE MOVE FROM PRINT TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY CHANGED YOUR PRACTICE?

GI: I still do analog photography. For me, it’s a ritual.

Please visit TheRivardReport for complete read. 

Ken Graves' The Home Front, tribute exhibition at Anglim Gilbert Gallery

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Anglim Gilbert Gallery is pleased to present The Home Front, an exhibition of photographs by Ken Graves (1942-2016).


The exhibition is a tribute to Graves who passed away earlier this year.  His career as a photographer began in San Francisco in the 1960's after undergoing studies at the San Francisco Art Institute. Moving to Pennsylvania shortly after, Graves taught photography at Pennsylvania State University for thirty years before returning to the Bay Area. In later years he was joined by his wife Eva Lipman in a collaborative photographic and darkroom practice.  He also created meticulous collages from found photo reproductions, using string, feathers, wire and other delicate materials.
His Home Front series began in the sixties while he was completing his studies at the San Francisco Art Institute. Graves observed everyday people, many firmly entrenched in the 'Establishment' life under critique, capturing strangeness in the normal at a time of social revolution in San Francisco. This was especially apparent to him as a student at the Art Institute.

Read more about the exhibition and series by Ken Graves on anglimgilbertgallery.com

Phil Tarley reviews Collectors' Favorites for Fabrik Magazine

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"The photophile community came together Saturday night for the opening of an exhibition of works selected from the private collections of PAC/LA members. Presented by Rose Shoshana at her eponymous Bergamot Station gallery, the show is a luxurious trove; a luminous offering of some of the most artful and interesting photography around. Co-ordinated by PAC/LA’s, Michael Hawley, the presentation was culled from a diversity of times and genres. Seventy works are included in this, a most extraordinary show.

The exposition features such masters as Robert Frank, Irving Penn, Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston, as well as new and vintage works by artists championed by PAC/LA collectors. You’ll see works by Lee Friedlander, Augusta Wood, Mary Ellen Mark, Torbjøn Rødland, Nick Waplington, Clarence Sinclair Bull, Dulce Pinzón, Rinko Kawauchi, Bruce Davidson, Margaret Bourke-White, and dozens more."

 "The desire to acquire fine art photography is a delicious malaise that seems to torment many people all over the world. There is no cure. As this strange malady develops, most of the afflicted seem to hone their skills and focus their collections. Connoisseurs of photography enjoy educating others about what they have learned about the works of art they have amassed. They delight in showing them off. ThePhotographic Art Council is a great place to do just that – and to acquire new works, as well."
-Phil Tarley

Read the entire review on fabrik.la

Exhibition Collectors' Favorites reviewed by KCRW's Edward Goldman in Art Talk

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Exhibitions with Artistic (and Political) Punch

Edward talks about current exhibitions at Bergamot Station with welcome artistic and even political surprises. 

24 August, by Edward Goldman

I stopped by Bergamot Station last week to check out a few exhibitions at various galleries and spent –– to my surprise –– more time there than I had initially intended. So let me take you on a short tour.

Alia Ali, "Dots II," 2016, K3 Pigment Print.  Nancy Hardin Collection

Alia Ali, "Dots II," 2016, K3 Pigment Print.  Nancy Hardin Collection

Torbjøn Rødland, "Celtic," 2009, Gelatin Silver Print.  Michael Hawley Collection

Torbjøn Rødland, "Celtic," 2009, Gelatin Silver Print.  Michael Hawley Collection

ROSEGALLERY has an unusual exhibition, Collectors' Favorites, which is comprised of over 70 photographs culled from private collections of members of the Photographic Arts Council – Los Angeles. This exhibition offers not only a rare chance to see works by such masters as Robert Frank, Irving Penn, Imogen Cunningham, and Edward Weston, but it also provides insights into the intriguing, and sometimes peculiar, preferences and choices made by these private collectors.

Lee Friedlander, "Mannequin Tucson," 2011.  Gelatin Silver Print.  The Conger Family Collection

Lee Friedlander, "Mannequin Tucson," 2011.  Gelatin Silver Print.  The Conger Family Collection

Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen, "Young Couple in a Backyard, Byker" 1975 (printed later) Gelatin Silver Print.  Michael Hawley Collection

Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen, "Young Couple in a Backyard, Byker" 1975 (printed later) Gelatin Silver Print.  Michael Hawley Collection

The exhibition is closing on September 3, but this coming Saturday, August 27, ROSEGALLERY will host a conversation between these LA photography collectors and Virginia Heckert, curator at the Getty Museum. This event is scheduled to start at 11:30am and is open to the public.

Read on at kcrw.com